drivenness


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drivenness

/driv·en·ness/ (driv´en-nes) hyperactivity (1).
organic drivenness  hyperactivity seen in brain-damaged individuals as a result of injury to and disorganization of cerebellar structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drivenness offered a cloak of permissibility to killing that no longer fit the category of "murder.
those high in work involvement and drivenness from inner pressures and with low enjoyment of work) scored much higher on job stress, perfectionism, and nondelegation of responsibility than work enthusiasts (i.
They had a big appetite for visual information, and we see that drivenness in the tremendously poised immediacy of their language.
James lived from 1842 to 1910, Williams from 1886 to 1945; James experienced the "irremediable impotence" of a wealthy young man prevented at every turn from finding his powers, while Williams experienced the humiliation and drivenness of a brilliant young man without resources.
The demand drivenness denotes the sense of intentional and voluntary learning based on specific and regulatory demands and personal needs.
The occasional drivenness of Larsen's character Helga resembles the consuming male's, but her desire is presented as degrading and ultimately defeating after she seduces a storefront preacher.
many men have found themselves driven to more domineering and some even `monstrous' displays in their frantic quest for a meaningful showdown"; for some men this drivenness "would eventually become a hunt for a shape-shifting enemy who could take the form of women .
Whereas Piggott had all the hallmarks of 24-carat drivenness, Hughes's reputation is as one of the lads, the life and soul, the easy talent with the wayward streak.
The critical helplessness of the church before the onrush of these forces may be emblem of this drivenness, though it seems to be read as a wave of sunny optimism to be caught.
Indeed, even after I shed my Christian identity, I retained this drivenness, which was essentially a form of grandiosity.
The workaholic is someone who scores high on the two assessment scales of Work Involvement and Drivenness to Work but low on the scale of Work Enjoyment.
But it came at a price; his drivenness made him ruthless and tyrannical, inflicting cruel wounds on his sonsnd employees--and, in the end, on the firm he loved so much.