label

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label

 [la´b'l]
something that identifies; an identifying mark or tag.
radioactive label a radioisotope that is incorporated into a compound to mark it.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

la·bel

(lā'bĕl),
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
See also: package insert.
2. The substance so incorporated.
See also: package insert.
3. Any display of written, printed, or graphic materials accompanying a pharmaceutical or a medical device at any time while such is in interstate commerce or offered for sale; often used as a synonym for package insert (q.v.).
See also: package insert.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

label

A description of a drug product or device provided by the manufacturer and approved by the regulatory authority of a particular country or jurisdiction, which includes indications for its use, who should use it, adverse events, instructions for use, and safety information.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

label

Pharmacology A display of written, printed or graphic matter upon a container or article; all information placed on the container must, in the case of medications, also be placed on the product's outside container or wrapper
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

la·bel

(lā'bĕl)
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
2. The substance so incorporated.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

label

any marker, often a radioactive atom (TRACER), that makes it possible to locate and monitor a particular molecule or organism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

la·bel

(sig) (lā'bĕl)
To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about label

Q. Provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations. Hello, Can any one provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations?

A. I have given some 5 basic questions and answers which are related to food labels and nutrition calculations. Hope you will find it useful:

1. How many calories would you consume if you ate the entire bag?
90 calories x 4 servings = 360 calories

2. What is the total amount of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
30 calories from fat x 4 servings = 120 calories

3. What is the percentage of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
120 calories from fat ÷ 360 calories = 33%

4. How many calories per serving come from carbohydrates?
13 g Carbohydrates x 4 calories = 52 calories

5. How many calories per serving come from protein?
3 g Protein x 4 calories = 12 calories

Hope you find is useful.

More discussions about label
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are dripstones of various types and colours, atypically warm in the cave."Regarding the natural conditions of the near surroundings, the discovery of a cave with these dimensions is unique," said Halama, as quoted by SITA.
Take one look at the exterior to spot the traditional mullioned, multi-paned windows, complete with dripstones.
Quality features include stone mullion windows under moulded dripstones, old timbering and fireplaces.
There is some formal 'Georgian' with the central front door and neat sash arrangement, and the rear offshoot, looking older with its dripstones, mullions and mouldings, even some tiny, though practical windows under the roof for more effect.
It keeps its handsome 19th century looks with some fine brickwork detailing and stone mullioned windows with dripstones. Modern benefits of the conversion include the surprising addition of an integral vacuum system, still a real luxury, even in the new homes marketplace.
The gabled look and the adherence to the vernacular style is impressive, classic Cotswold features also including the dripstones and leaded lights.