Drinker


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Drin·ker

(drink'ĕr),
Philip, U.S. industrial hygienist, 1893-1972. See: Drinker respirator.
References in periodicals archive ?
A CARDIFF off-licence has denied police claims it is "a magnet" for street drinkers who urinate in public and often become violent in a central city street.
Perhaps it's the association with James Bond that drives them, but Gin drinkers, according to the study, spend an average of $82.40 on Amazon while under the influence of their favourite Sloe.
The irony with regard to decaf is that restaurateurs, the coffee industry in general and even decaffeinated coffee drinkers themselves have seemingly come to accept that any coffee drinker who doesn't want caffeine in their coffee is especially undeserving of a good cup of coffee.
Data Source: Results were taken from a cross-sectional study of 229 adults, none of whom was a problem drinker.
Drinker Biddle began more than 160 years ago with a single lawyer in Philadelphia and today comprises more than 650 lawyers in 11 offices across the US.
Casswell acknowledged, however, that the findings do not prove that being around a heavy drinker was the root of study participants' problems, noting that the study is just "a snapshot at one point in time."
Compared to people who didn't have heavy drinkers in their lives, they also did less well on standard measures of general health -- such as chronic pain, anxiety and depression symptoms -- and had lower overall satisfaction with life.
Participants were more likely to over-estimate their BAC's than to under-estimate them but this trend was much more pronounced for light drinkers than for heavy drinkers.
will allow people to experience the authentic Brazil for themselves, with strong on-premise sampling and media support that will deliver the cachet of Brazilian ginga in a way relevant to how beer drinkers live," says Thorpe.
In this study, 48% of the respondents were male and 52% were female, and the binge drinker by country by gender cross-tabulation revealed no significant difference.
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is common among those who are heavy alcohol drinkers. Compared to non-drinkers, those who drank moderately were 1.3 times more at risk for cancer while those who drank heavily were 5 times more at risk.
The specimens were from the brains of 11 individuals who started drinking heavily before the age of 21 or early-onset drinkers; 11 individuals who started drinking seriously after the age of 21, known as late-onset drinkers; and 22 individuals with no history of alcohol use disorder.