drink the Kool-Aid


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drink the Kool-Aid

verb (US colloquial) To adopt the dogma of a group or leader without fully understanding its ramifications or implications; to participate in dangerous or lethal activities, or in something destined to fail, due to peer pressure.

The phrase “drinking the Kool-Aid” comes from the Jonestown Massacre of 1978, in which hundreds of members of the People’s Temple Agricultural Project in Guyana died after consuming a cyanide-laced powdered soft drink as part of a ritual suicide under the instruction of the cult leader Jim Jones. Many of these deaths are believed to be forced suicide or murder, rather than voluntary.
References in periodicals archive ?
McCaughey that said, "all it takes to see the fallacy of "health-care reform" is to read the various bills and not drink the kool-aid being poured.
Which must mean that soon the socalled "Dignitas" Swiss finishing-off school, where sad cases go to drink the Kool-Aid, will be coming to a street like yours.
Hopefully, by the time our three kids are socially conscious adult consumers, gender will be acknowledged as a wide spectrum, and toys will be available in a variety of colors for kids to choose from, without having to buy in to sickly-sweet or testosterone-fueled visions of childhood, or drink the Kool-Aid, to get the toy.
Fewer cities seem as interested in being held hostage by team owners, and fewer people drink the Kool-Aid that says a professional team is the answer to the difficulties of a city.
The young man and his companion looked at me as if I had suggested they drink the Kool-Aid.
You gotta drink the Kool-Aid," our publisher says when he wants us all to buy into a new idea, especially a risky one.
One source compared the men to a suicide cult dying by poison and said: 'We know that even with suicide cults, several members have to be forced to drink the Kool-Aid.
The Wall Street Journal quoted one individual saying, "They don't drink the Kool-Aid over there," referring to the level-headed reporting that characterized the magazine.