acceptor

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acceptor

 [ak-sep´ter]
a substance that unites with another substance.
hydrogen acceptor the molecule accepting hydrogen in an oxidation-reduction reaction.

ac·cep·tor

(ak-sep'ter),
1. A compound that will take up a chemical group (for example, an amine, methyl, or carbamoyl group) from another compound (the donor); under the action of alanine transaminase, l-glutamate is an amine donor whereas pyruvate is an amine acceptor.
2. A receptor that binds a hormone.
3. A drug-binding receptor that has no identified endogenase ligand.
[L. ac-cipio, pp. -ceptus, to accept]

ac·cep·tor

(ak-sept'ŏr)
A compound that will take up a chemical group (e.g., an amine group, a methyl group, a carbamoyl group) from another compound (the donor).
[L. ac-cipio, pp. -ceptus, to accept]
References in periodicals archive ?
"The assessment of the drawee's rights requires a more nuanced enquiry.
b) No party of a draft or check initially has primary liability since the drawee has only been ordered by the drawer to make payment.
Original checks will likely be destroyed by the drawee bank after the electronic image is sent to the depository bank.
In advising clients about the tax advantages of making lifetime gifts to relatives and friends, CPAs should point out that checks must be paid by the drawee bank prior to the donor's death.
But, by common law, payment in full or at par was required only if the check was presented for payment at the bank against which it was drawn (the drawee bank).
Apparently, the term "debtor" as used in this provision includes a drawee, as well as a prior holder against whom rights of recourse are sought.
The court ruled that although it is a general rule that a check is not absolute payment until it is paid by the drawee bank, a contract vendee of property cannot use this general rule to withdraw from a contract before her downpayment check is deposited and paid by the bank.
Some companies have the lockbox bank electronically capture the MICR line information (the information in the bottom line of the check containing the drawee bank, account number of the payer, and the amount).
Thus, even though under Maryland law the gifts were not completed until the drawee bank accepted the checks, the gifts were considered completed in 1985 because of the relation-back doctrine and Albert's estate was not increased by the $20,000.
Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, which ruled that "payment by check is deemed to have occurred...when the check is honored by the drawee bank."
The Court held that a depository bank's mailing of a cashed check, drawn on the dummy corporation, to the drawee bank was not sufficiently related to the fraudulent scheme.