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bridge

 [brij]
1. a fixed partial denture; see illustration.
A bridge unit serves to restore a functional unit by replacing one or more missing teeth. A fixed bridge consists of abutment and pontic teeth splinted together. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.
2. a protoplasmic structure uniting adjacent elements of a cell, similar in plants and animals.
conjugative bridge in bacterial conjugation, a connection formed between two bacterial cells by the attachment of an F pilus from an F+ cell to an F cell.
disulfide bridge disulfide bond.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bridge

(brij),
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bridge

(brĭj)
n.
1.
a. The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
b. The part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests against this ridge.
2. A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
3. Chemistry An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.

bridge′a·ble adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

BRIDGE

Beta Radiation Investigation With Direct Stenting and Galileo in Europe. A study which evaluated intracoronary 32P radiation and the Galileo Radiotherapy System after direct Multi-Link Rx Tetra coronary stenting.
 
Conclusion
32P intravascular brachytherapy reduces in-stent neointimal proliferation and restenosis; thrombosis was a major problem.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bridge

Dentistry A fixed partial denture; a prosthetic replacement of missing teeth cemented or attached to abutment teeth or implants adjacent to the space; removable partial denture is a prosthetic replacement of missing teeth on a framework that can be removed by a Pt Physical therapy An exercise in which a person lays on his/her back with bended knees, while lifting the pelvis, placing thighs, back and pelvis in a straight line, strengthening abdominal, lower back, gluteus and hamstring muscles Transplantation medicine An organ surrogate that carries out a particular physiologic function and “buys time” for a Pt awaiting a donor organ for transplantation
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the external nose formed by the junction of the nasal bones.
2. The curved part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests on the bridge of the nose.
3. A narrow band of tissue.
4. A cast dental restoration that replaces missing teeth. The restoration is usually made of gold alloy, with or without a porcelain exterior, and is attached to adjacent or abutment teeth for support.
4. The use of a short-acting drug when treatment with a longer-acting drug must be temporarily interrupted or during the initiation of the long-acting drug before it reaches full therapeutic effectiveness.

Patient care

Bridging is commonly used for perioperative anticoagulation. In patients who have atrial fibrillation or a history of blood clotting, warfarin, which has a relatively long half-life, is withheld several days before surgery. The bridge consists of the administration of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), which have a shorter half-life, until about 12 hr before the procedure in order to prevent clotting. At a safe time after the operation, LMWHs are reinstituted until warfarin reaches therapeutic levels, e.g., an international normalized ratio of 2 or more. The duration of bridging therapy varies but is typically between 2 days and 1 week.

Enlarge picture
BRIDGING
5. An exercise for activating the abdominal and hip extensor muscles. The patient lies on his back with knees flexed and feet flat against a horizontal surface, such as a floor, bed, or plinth (treatment table). The patient then lifts his hips while his feet, shoulders, and head maintain contact with the surface. Bridging is often recommended as part of preprosthetic training for patients with transtibial or transfemoral lower extremity amputations. See: illustration

CAUTION!

Bridging should always be performed while the prosthesis is removed.

disulfide bridge

Disulfide bond.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

bridge

A fixed support for false teeth which bridges across the gap between surviving natural teeth.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Bridge

An appliance of one or more artificial teeth anchored by crowns on the adjacent teeth.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bridge 

That part of a spectacle frame which forms the main connection between the lenses or rims. The bridge assembly is generally taken to include the pads, if any (British Standard). See spectacles.
flush bridge The bridge of a spectacle frame with zero projection.
inset bridge A spectacle frame so shaped that the bearing surface of the bridge is behind the plane of the lenses.
keyhole bridge Bridge of a spectacle frame with pads, looking like the outline of the upper part of a keyhole.
pad bridge A bridge of a spectacle frame with two pads acting as the resting surface on the nose.
saddle bridge A bridge so shaped as to rest on the nose over a continuous area, but in which the ends of the bearing surface are extended to lie behind the back plane of the front (British Standard).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Last, but not least, we are excited about a few other drawbridges that are being built.
Drawbridge gradually became a weekend retreat for families, reaching its peak of popularity in the 1930s.
'We are also targeting many local visitors from Kelantan and Pahang to come to Kuala Terengganu to see the drawbridge. Even now, when the bridge has not yet been opened, many visitors from Kelantan come here just to look at it from afar,' he said in an exclusive interview with Bernama here.
The company plans to combine its extensive 1st-party location data asset with Drawbridge's identity graph through a separate data license established through the purchase.
What no one yet seems to have suggested is the alternative of pulling up the UK drawbridge and expanding our national economic base to achieve greater selfsufficiency.
"We're observing your behaviors and connecting your profile to mobile devices,'' said Eric Rosenblum, chief operating officer at Drawbridge. But don't call it tracking.
"You have been incredibly adept at making us feel as if we had total access while keeping the drawbridge firmly pulled up" - TV's Graham Norton, in an open-letter tribute to the Queen.
The body was discovered in North Worcestershire, near the Drawbridge pub, Shirley, by a member of the public at 7.30am on Thursday.
Caption: The new Woodrow Wilson Bridge in Washington, DC won the 2008 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers for a project that "best illustrates superior civil engineering skills." The $2.47 billion bridge over the Potomac River between Virginia and Maryland consists of two side-by-side drawbridge spans carrying 12 lanes of traffic.
Developer Drawbridge Securities (Ditton) is behind the scheme, called Innovis, which will provide 1m sq ft of industrial and warehouse space on the banks of the River Mersey.
Officials told the couple inDecember they needed planning permission for the wooden structure, complete with mock tower, drawbridge, slides and rope swings, at ``Beckingham Palace'' in Sawbridgeworth, Herts