draught

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draft

(draft),
1. A current of air in a confined space.
2. A quantity of liquid medicine ordered as a single dose.
Synonym(s): draught
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

draft

(draft)
1. A current of air in a confined space.
2. A quantity of liquid medicine ordered as a single dose.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

draft

(draft)
1. A current of air in a confined space.
2. A quantity of liquid medicine ordered as a single dose. Also spelled draught.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"The analogy was not advice on how to help Mr and Mrs Kemp deal with draughty windows but merely a simplified way of explaining why and how heat can be lost."
Bear in mind though, original sash windows are notoriously draughty, and you may prefer to get a pro to draught-proof and refurbish them more thoroughly.
Ann Doherty via email Zena says: Portiere rods or swing arm door rods are normally what people use to hang curtains or drapes in front of draughty doors.
But there are plenty of ways to celebrate without coming to a draughty Victorian building," the Daily Mail quoted Ritchie as saying.
Dai said: "The windows were put in by Gwynedd Council about eight years ago but they weren't installed properly and they have twisted in their frames and are very draughty. The cracks are so wide I can put my fingers in them.
Coming home each night To the same draughty house he
The ill-fitting backless, draughty gowns are set to be a thing of the past, thanks to a pounds 25,000 project by designer Ben De Lisi.
Dear Editor, I was very interested to read your article on energy prices and ways of reducing fuel running costs in a old draughty house (Post, March 1).
The ground Open and draughty, though most views are unrestricted.
At his best, Curtis's striking imagery, attention to technique, and historical perspective produce satisfying poems like "Faces," "Last Things," "Ernie's House," "Looking into the Field," "English Oaks," and "The Digger." Curtis has an eye for detail, as when he observes dust "in its draughty waltz through the air" in "The Break." The inferior poems are marred by sentimentality both in content and form.