drape

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drape

(drāp),
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or on which to be operated.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

drape

(drāp)
v.
To cover, dress, or hang with or as if with cloth in loose folds.
n.
A paper or cloth covering placed over a patient's body during medical examination or treatment, designed to provide privacy or a sterile operative field.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
noun The sterilised cloths that mark off an operative field
verb To cover and mark off a field before performing a sterile procedure
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

drape

Surgery verb To cover and mark off a field before performing a sterile procedure
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drape

(drāp)
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or operated on.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

drape

(drāp)
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or on which to be operated.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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Kraton-based elastic nonwovens are proven to be drapeable, non-tacky and breathable with a dry hand, enabling the creation of products that are soft and discrete.
We can make it in large pads, a hand wipe format and a large drapeable cloth."
"Key features seen with Kraton Polymer's polymer-based nonwovens are that they are drapeable, non-tacky and breathable, allowing for products that are soft and discrete," said Frost & Sullivan research analyst Christina Priya Dhanuja.