dramatic play


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dramatic play

[dramat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, drama, deed; AS, plegan, game
an imitative activity in which a child fantasizes and acts out various domestic and social roles and situations, such as rocking a doll, pretending to be a doctor or nurse, or teaching school. It is the predominant form of play among preschool children.
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Once on the destination planet a number of events occurred: the dramatic play here continued for well over 45 minutes with the children talking in role as astronauts, imagining what they could see, and negotiating the action and events of the story.
Embedded in this research question is an exploration of teachers' attitudes and practices toward rough-and-tumble play, the form of active dramatic play most often favored by young boys.
Bringing books to life: The role of book-related dramatic play in young children's literacy learning.
It is also clearly in the interest of language and literacy development to provide preschool children with dramatic play experiences that draw from familiar thematic contexts (Ferguson, 1999).
We create a spectacle with a complete plot outline--rising action, climax, and resolution," says Eifman, "but it is not a dramatic play, not a retelling of the story.
The eight-employee firm also creates storage cabinets and dramatic play centers, which include a kitchen facility complete with a microwave, stove, refrigerator, iron and ironing board.
At night, its symbolic purpose is emphasised when both the gleaming white structure and the translucent deck of the bridge are illuminated, reflecting a dramatic play of light on to the river surface.
It is through dramatic play, contend the investigators, that one learns thoughts, feelings, and social skills.
In the title essay of Language As Gesture (1952), he described linguistic gesture as " the outward dramatic play of inward and imaged meaning.
Haley, Illinois' top middle level volunteer, was recognized for conducting personal interviews and research to create museum-like displays and a dramatic play that portray important aspects of her city's history.
Their topics include observation and assessment, the learning environment, the child's world: social studies and dramatic play, fine motor and manipulatives, and construction: blocks and woodworking.
The space is outfitted with child-friendly and educator-approved elements, including a chalkboard wall, reading corner, dramatic play, art lab infant area, and construction corner.