damselfly

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damselfly

any insect of the suborder Zygoptera, similar to but smaller than dragonflies.
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Alternatively, the association between massive dragonfly flights and cold fronts may be indirect, occurring via a direct influence of the strong northwesterly winds that often accompany cold front passage in the Northeast.
TTP Labtech premiered prototype instruments last year at SLAS and have continued to collaborate closely with leading pharmaceutical companies on the further development of dragonfly discovery.
So do other birds and even those spiders that are fortunate enough to catch a dragonfly in their webs.
The Dragonfly group appears to be interested in both learning how energy facilities operate and also gaining access to operational systems themselves, to the extent that the group now potentially has the ability to sabotage or gain control of these systems should it decide to do so.
Prior to joining Dragonfly, Dr Grinberg spent 12 years at Acceleron Pharma discovering and developing novel protein therapeutics for treatment of hematopoietic diseases and cancer.
Ahmad (1994) identified 21 dragonfly species belonging to 14 genera and 4 families from Khyber Pakhtonkhwa province of Pakistan.
Combining a "smartphone app" with an Ethernet-connected hub kit and a choice of internal and/or external MotionViewer[R] cameras, the DragonFly security system installs in minutes utilizing an existing home router.
They love inventing toys and naming all manner of things and animals, but best of all is flying their magical dragonfly kites.
The galaxy, Dragonfly 44, is located in the nearby Coma constellation and had been overlooked until last year because of its unusual composition: It is a diffuse "blob" about the size of the Milky Way, but with far fewer stars.
Dragonfly 44, consists of the mysterious unseen material that accounts for 27% of the universe.
Named Dragonfly 44, it is about 300 million light-years away in the Coma constellation with an estimated mass of about 1 trillion times that of the sun.
And if you're lucky, you might even spot a newly-emerged (teneral) dragonfly.