doxorubicin


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doxorubicin

 [dok″so-roo´bĭ-sin]
an antitumor antibiotic that binds to DNA, inhibits synthesis of nucleic acids, and inhibits cell division. It has one of the widest spectrums of antitumor activity of any antineoplastic agent and is administered intravenously as the hydrochloride salt. Side effects include bone marrow depression, alopecia, and cardiac toxicity; electroencephalogram monitoring is required during its administration. A liposome-encapsulated preparation of the hydrochloride salt is used in the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

dox·o·ru·bi·cin

(doks'ō-rū'bi-sin),
An antineoplastic antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius; also used in cytogenetics to produce Q-type chromosome bands.
Synonym(s): adriamycin

doxorubicin

/doxo·ru·bi·cin/ (dok″so-roo´bĭ-sin) an antineoplastic antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces peucetius, which binds to DNA and inhibits nucleic acid synthesis; used as the hydrochloride salt and as a liposome-encased preparation of the hydrochloride salt.

doxorubicin

(dŏk′sə-ro͞o′bĭ-sĭn)
n.
An antibiotic obtained from the bacterium Streptomyces peuceticus, used as an anticancer drug.

ABDIC

A "salvage" chemotherapy regimen used for patients who have a disease—e.g., lymphoma—relapse after radiation therapy or chemotherapy.

doxorubicin

Adriamycin Oncology An anthracycline antibiotic used for leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, solid tumors Adverse effects BM suppression, alopecia, vomiting, stomatitis, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy. See Chemotherapy.

dox·o·ru·bi·cin

(doks'ō-rū'bi-sin)
An antineoplastic antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius; also used in cytogenetics to produce Q-type chromosome bands.
Synonym(s): adriamycin.

doxorubicin

An antibiotic, also known as Adriamycin, that interferes with the synthesis of DNA and is thus useful an an anticancer agent. It has many side effects including loss of hair, sickness and vomiting, interference with blood production and heart damage. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Caelyx.

doxorubicin

an antineoplastic antibiotic, which binds to DNA and inhibits synthesis of nucleic acids and cell division. It is used intravenously to produce regression in various neoplastic conditions. The side-effects include bone marrow depression, alopecia and cardiac toxicity. Called also adriamycin. See also anthracycline antibiotic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decreased cardiotoxicity of GPX-150 compared to doxorubicin and other anthracyclines has been demonstrated in preclinical studies and several early clinical studies, supporting the safety and efficacy of GPX-150, the company said.
These positive data led to the start of the pivotal Phase III Atlantis trial to enroll 600 patients over 154 centers in 20 countries and to compare the combination of PM1183 and doxorubicin, versus either Topotecan or CAV (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicine and vincristine).
Co-administration of vitamin C with doxorubicin significantly reduced (p<0.
Doppler echocardiographic examination was performed on day zero (TO), before the first treatment, and after the last administration of doxorubicin (T45).
Results proved the effective performance of selenium and zinc oxide nanoparticles in reducing side effects of doxorubicin and the protecting the reproduction system in rats.
To investigate the differences among the formulations of doxorubicin in vivo, a literature search is conducted.
Sil, "The protective role of arjunolic acid against doxorubicin induced intracellular ROS dependent JNK-p38 and p53-mediated cardiac apoptosis," Biomaterials, vol.
Doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), verapamil (VPL) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) were purchased from Sigma (Saint Quentin Fallavier, France).
Furthermore the outcome of most potent and widely used doxorubicin chemotherapy can be made successful with the concurrent use of a-Tocopherol.
Doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection is currently on the FDA's drug shortage list of supply.
A team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has identified an unexpected mechanism that drives the drug's attack on heart muscle, providing a new approach for identifying patients who can safely tolerate doxorubicin and for developing new drugs.