douche

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douche

 [do̳sh]
a stream of water or air directed against a part of the body or into a cavity.
air douche a current of air blown into a cavity, particularly into the tympanum to open the eustachian tube.
vaginal douche irrigation of the vagina to cleanse the area, to apply medicated solutions to the vaginal mucosa and the cervix, or to apply heat in order to relieve pain, inflammation, and congestion. For the treatment to be effective the patient must be in the dorsal recumbent position with the hips level with the chest. Excessive pressure in administering the douche should be avoided so that solution is not forced through the cervix into the endometrial cavity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

douche

(dūsh),
1. A current of water, gas, or vapor directed against a surface or projected into a cavity.
2. An instrument for giving a douche.
3. To apply a douche.
[Fr. fr. doucher, to pour]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

douche

(do͞osh)
n.
1.
a. A stream of water, often containing medicinal or cleansing agents, that is applied to a body part or cavity for hygienic or therapeutic purposes.
b. A stream of air applied in a similar way.
2. The application of a douche.
3. An instrument for applying a douche.
4. Vulgar Slang A foolish or contemptible person.
v. douched, douching, douches
v.tr.
To cleanse or treat by means of a douche.
v.intr.
To cleanse or treat oneself with a douche.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

douche

(dūsh)
1. A current of water, gas, or vapor directed against a surface or projected into a cavity.
2. An instrument for giving a douche.
3. To apply a douche.
[Fr. fr. doucher, to wash off]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

douche

A washing out of a body cavity or opening by a stream of water or other fluid. Vaginal douching is much used by women with vaginal discharge.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

douche

(dūsh)
1. Current of water, gas, or vapor directed against surface or projected into a cavity.
2. An instrument for giving a douche.
3. To apply a douche.
[Fr. fr. doucher, to wash off]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
According to findings of a study in eight Florida Panhandle countries, 76% women reported having douched at least once.12 A study among military women stated that 54.5% indulged in VD at least once in their time lifetime, 63.5% during the preceding year.13 Prevalence of VD among women depends on geographical locations; 32% in Baltimore,8 46.1% in Alabama,22 57% in Texas;21 37.9% women across the United States reported VD behaviour at least once.9 In the present study the prevalence of VD was lower than those reported in earlier findings.
In the current study, about one-third of women douched every day or at least 1-2 times a week or more than twice a week, and only 4.4% women used VD rarely.
However, commercial and trademark products were used more often in some developed countries.19,25 A study found that 58% women used commercial douching products and 3.7% of them used home-mixed solution such as soda and water, vinegar and water, water, bleach solutions.12 One study found that women who had douched regularly used many other female hygiene products (feminine sprays, wipes, powders) than women who did not do VD.23 Contrary to the findings, as these products were not common in Turkey, in our study only water usage for VD was more frequent.
Douching during pregnancy was associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of preterm delivery, compared with women who never douched. Black women who douched had a slightly higher 2.1-fold increased risk of preterm delivery.
Two-thirds of the sample had ever douched, and these women had a higher prevalence than women who had never done so (36% vs.
When all factors that were significantly related to prevalence or that were considered clinically relevant were controlled for, hormonal contraceptive use continued to have a protective effect (odds ratio, 0.5), and having douched within the past two months remained a risk factor (2.9).
The young women who douched reported having more sex partners in the previous 2 months and more lifetime partners than nondouchers, Dr.
The type of douching preparation made little difference in cancer risk among the women studied, although those who douched with vinegar and water had slightly higher cancer rates than those who used commercial preparations, plain water or a mixture of water and baking soda.