doubling time


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doubling time

the time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.
Experimental biology The time necessary for a zygote or cells in culture to increase two-fold; the doubling time is usually longer than the average generation time of the individual cells of the population as there are growth constraints on the population—e.g., nutritional, senescence, death
Oncology A parameter used to determine tumour aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumour kinetics and growth rate

doubling time

Oncology A parameter used to determine tumor aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumor kinetics and growth rate. Cf Gompertzian growth curve.

doub·ling time

(dŭb'ling tīm)
The time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.

doubling time

or

generation time

(in microbiology) the time in which the number of cells in a population doubles.
References in periodicals archive ?
At first, we explore the effect of doubling time on tumor expansion keeping the rest modeling parameters constant.
Overall doubling time of 3 cell lines was reduced in the presence of CBS, while for 2 cell lives FBS proved to be better growth stimulant.
If doubling time is known, how can it help defense counsel construct a defense that shows that any alleged delay in diagnosis had no relation to a poor outcome?
Widespread recommendations from the family practice and obstetrics literature encourage the use of a simple 48-hour doubling time standard without emphasis on its limitations.[8,13,14] Thus, in case 1, the radiologist's original ultrasonogram interpretation of "most consistent with a blighted ovum," (confirmed 1 week later by a "no change" reading) was "substantiated" by the failure of [beta]-HCG levels to double appropriately.
(1) Again, PSA doubling time increased, from 15 months at baseline to 60 months at follow-up.
PSA kinetics are important, for helping us identify patients at risk of early death, but there is no standard technique to determine PSA doubling time. Failure at less than 3 years, Gleasonscore of 8 or more, and a short doubling time (less than 3 months) are all important signs of heightened risk.
We identify an inverse relationship between the average CFR and the average doubling time for different countries (Figure 2).
PSA kinetics are important for helping us identify patients at risk of early death, but there is no standard technique to determine PSA doubling time. Failure at less than 3 years, Gleason score of 8 or more, and a short doubling time (less than 3 months) are all important signs of heightened risk.
A total of 10 of the 19 high-risk patients and all of the low-risk patients (9) who were treated with radioimmunotherapy had favorable biologic responses, defined as increase in calcitonin doubling time of more than 100% after treatment, compared with pretreatment.
Those men whose testing during the surveillance period revealed a PSA doubling time of 3 years or less and/or grade progression on rebiopsy to a Gleason score of 7 or higher, as well as those who chose not to continue on active surveillance, were offered radical intervention.
Men whose testing during the surveillance period showed a PSA doubling time of 3 years or less and/or grade progression on re-biopsy to a Gleason score of 7 or higher, as well as those who chose not to continue on active surveillance, were offered radical intervention.
The median PSA doubling time in the cohort was 7 years.