double bind


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

double bind

 [dŭ´b'l bīnd´]
a type of paradoxical communication or interaction in which one person demands a response to a message that contains mutually contradictory signals (verbal or nonverbal). The other person is unable to comment on the incongruity or to escape the situation.

dou·ble bind

a type of personal interaction in which one receives two mutually conflicting verbal or nonverbal instructions or demands from the same person or different people, resulting in a situation in which either compliance or noncompliance with either alternative threatens one of the needed relationships.

double bind

n.
A psychological impasse created when a person perceives that someone in a position of power is making contradictory demands, so that no response is appropriate.
A situation in which option A and its alternative, option B, both have considerable disadvantages
Psychiatry An interpersonal dilemma in which a person is presented with mutually contradictory messages by another person, usually one who is respected by, or who has authority over, the person receiving the ‘mixed message’
References in periodicals archive ?
(34) This refigures differently the double bind: one must tell the whole story, yet there can be no more stories.
(2) And people who hear dilemmas as "double binds" are susceptible to even more debilitating emotional reactions.
Figuring into both the negative and the positive sides of my reader's double bind is this book's dual loyalty in generic terms.
In 1985, curiously including neither the Putnam paper nor that by Wood and Conrad in its bibliography, Kathleen Hall Jamieson's Beyond the Double Bind: Women and Leadership, appeared.
KEYWORDS: Translation; deconstruction; double translation; differance; double bind.
Caddy is the one family member who could help Quentin escape from the family's double-bind pattern, but she too is tied to the double bind created for Quentin.
"When I became head of the physical and health education department, I was unaware of the double binds this leadership role would thrust upon me." Jamieson's book looks at these Catch 22 situations, by examining their roots in theology, biology, morality and the law.
articulated in the Phenomenology of Spirit" (8) than as an example of self-reflexive criticism that demonstrates, in its exposition of Du Bois's Hegelianism, the deeply complex, even tricky work of (re)constructing the omnicritical genealogy which is Adell's own double bind. Like the dilemma faced by poststructuralists committed to theorizing African American literature (among whom Adell takes Henry Louis Gates, Houston Baker, and Robert Stepto to be most representative), "The Souls of Black Folk: Reading Across the Color Line" is most instructive when, paradoxically, it shows itself mired in the textual system that she observes Du Bois, by necessity, writing through.
The uncritical listener, for example, might choose one or both for the "worse" in the following double bind:
To address these questions, the connections between the two concepts within the family systems framework are assessed, and the case of one youngster's suicide attempts are discussed and placed in context to illustrate how double bind contingencies and boundary transgression may contribute to our understanding of how suicidal behavior occurs in adolescence.
It represented a classic double bind. "Before Forest Ag, development became a self-fulfilling prophecy," Osterman said.
Johnson astutely relates these ideas to Freud's analysis of the apparently contradictory relation of memory and perception, and then examines Derrida's style of writing by following closely several word-associations, such as ecart, entamer, economy, articulation, and the double bind. He then proceeds to examine Darwinian evolutionary theory, with its emphasis upon innovation, adaptation, non-teleological 'development', and on evolution as affecting and changing the codes through openness to mutation and feedback.