dose equivalent

(redirected from dose equivalents)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to dose equivalents: absorbed dose, effective dose

dose e·quiv·a·lent

(dōs ē-kwiv'ă-lĕnt)
In radiation therapy, product of absorbed dose and the quality factor; the SI unit of dose equivalent is sievert (Sv).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dose equivalent

In radiology, the product of the absorbed dose and the quality factor. Expressed in rems or sieverts, it measures the effects of absorbing different types of radiation. See: quality factor
See also: equivalent
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Calibration curve for MTS-6 thermoluminescent detector describing the relationship between the dose equivalent (H) and impulses received after detector's readout
Calculated dose equivalent rates and the assessed thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) exposure time in the paraffin block containing a [sup.239]Pu-Be source Dose equivalent rate Detectors [Sv/h] exposure time [h] 0.044 [+ or -] 0.001 72 0.087 [+ or -] 0.002 144 0.146 [+ or -] 0.004 240 0.293 [+ or -] 0.007 480 [sup.239]Pu-Be--plutonium and beryllium.
The count rate (R.), deviations from mean count rate ([DELTA]R), dose equivalent (D;), deviations from mean dose equivalent ([DELTA]D) and percentage deviations from mean (%[DELTA]) for the 10 locations of the college campus environment are displayed in Table 1.
The highest dose equivalent is 0.81[+ or -]0.19 mSv/yr (18.50[+ or -] 4.30 cpm) measured at Bakana while the lowest value is 0.57[+ or -]0.16 mSv/yr (13.04[+ or -]3.61 cpm) occurring at Ke community.
For the industrial areas of the state (Tables 4 and 5) (Avwiri and Ebeniro 2002), we have computed the dose equivalent (Table 6) to afford easy comparison of the data for the three sub environments of the state.
Comparing the data for the three sub-environments, we find that the highest dose equivalent of 1.332[+ or -] 0.076 mSv/yr occurs in the industrial zone while the lowest value of 0.57[+ or -]0.16 mSv/yr occurs in the rural riverine sub environment.
Count rate (R), dose equivalent (D), deviations from mean count rate (AR) and dose equivalent (AD) and percentage deviation from mean (%A) for various locations (upland college campus environment).
We calculated MOEs by taking the ratio of the point of departure, chlorpyrifos's BM[D.sub.10], to the estimated minimum, average, and maximum single-day cumulative dose equivalents (Figure 2).
Table 4 presents summary statistics for average cumulative OP pesticide dose equivalents derived from three spot urine samples.
Because urine samples were variable and uncorrelated between sampling periods, we present the women's estimated minimum and maximum single-day cumulative dose equivalents in addition to their average cumulative dose equivalent (Figure 2).
We found that 14.8% of estimated cumulative dose equivalents exceeded the index chemical's BM[D.sub.10] divided by a 100-fold uncertainty factor (14.8 [micro]g/kg/day).
We calculated MOEs for the estimated minimum, average, and maximum single-day cumulative dose equivalents. Figure 2 presents a range of MOEs at various percentiles on a logarithmic scale.