donor

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donor

 [do´ner]
1. a person or organism that supplies an organ or tissue to be used in another body, usually either a cadaveric, living related, or living unrelated donor; see transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
Algorithm for organ donation. From McQuillan, 2002.
cadaveric donor an organ or tissue donor who has already died; see cadaveric donor transplantation.
living nonrelated donor living unrelated donor.
living related donor one who is a close blood relative of the recipient; see living related donor transplantation.
living unrelated donor one who is not a close blood relative of the recipient; see living unrelated donor transplantation.
non–heart beating cadaveric donor a donor who has been pronounced dead according to the traditional criteria of lack of any pulse or detectable cardiac activity, but is not yet brain dead (see brain death). There are two types: The controlled donor is a person in a vegetative state who has signed a consent form or otherwise stated his or her wishes before becoming ill. Based on the patient's stated wishes and at the request of the next-of-kin, cannulas are placed into blood vessels for postmortem cooling of organs and the person is removed from life support. Once death has been declared, the organs are rapidly perfused with cold preservative solution and surgically removed. The uncontrolled donor is a person declared dead because of catastrophic injury to the heart, such as a gunshot wound to the heart. Cannulas are placed into blood vessels after death and the organs are perfused and removed. This also requires consent of next-of-kin.
universal donor a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion. Transfusion of blood cells rather than whole blood is preferred.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr),
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor; for example, methionine is a methyl donor; glutathione is a glutamyl donor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor, for example, nitrogen, which will donate both electrons to a shared pool in forming a coordinate bond.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]

donor

(dō′nər)
n.
1. Medicine An individual from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transfusion, implantation, or transplant.
2. Chemistry An atom, molecule, or ion that provides a part to combine with an acceptor, especially an atom that provides two electrons to form a bond with another atom.
3. Electronics An element introduced into a semiconductor with a negative valence greater than that of the pure semiconductor.
adj.
Medicine Used for transfusion, implantation, or transplant: a donor organ.

donor

The giver of a tissue, an organ, blood or blood products; in the usual parlance, an altruistic person who contributes blood products, often regularly. See Anencephalic organ donor, Oxydonor, Universal donor.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr)
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]

donor

A person, or cadaver, from whom blood, tissue or an organ is taken for transfusion or transplantation into another.

donor

an individual supplying tissue (e.g. blood), genetic material to a recipient. See COMPATIBILITY, ABO BLOOD GROUP, UNIVERSAL DONOR RECIPIENT, CONJUGATION.

Donor

A healthy person who contributes bone marrow for transplantation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Model of Personal Donorship (Mount, 1996) suggests that the level of involvement of a donor is an important predictor of the giving behavior of that donor and that involvement is the result of expected satisfaction.
The participants in the International Meeting on Good Humanitarian Donorship committed themselves to allocating humanitarian funding in proportion to needs and to exploring the possibility of reducing earmarking and introducing longer-term funding arrangements.
This is the part my wife prefers that I not write about--not the quirky, clutching mysticism but the enormously complicated choice of egg donorship, which neither of us had ever suspected would elicit such callous response from our closest friends.
Zoe Pickering and Craig Williams, parents of heart transplant baby Roman Williams, are backing the Mirror's campaign to change the law on organ donorship to an opt-out system.
europa.edu/echo/files/policies/consensus/communication_en.pdf; Good Humanitarian Donorship Initiatives, June 17, 2003, http://www.goodhumanitariandonorship.org/gns/ about-ghd/overview.aspx [hereinafter GHD].
Of course, compulsory donorship must become law - an extension of road tax, if you like.
This bias towards complex emergencies is clearly observed by the Humanitarian Policy Group research report on donorship trends, which notes that, "as a comparison of overall humanitarian aid on the FTS [Financial Tracking Service] from 1999-2004, only 8 percent has been for natural disasters." (39) If international response is to improve, especially through essential response preparedness measures, this ratio has to change.
Thus was born the Good Humanitarian Donorship Initiative, which seeks to hold donors such as OFDA more accountable to all of their stakeholders--affected populations, taxpayers, and other donors--for their policies and decisions.
The case for voluntary blood donorship. J Soc Pol 1982; 10: 53-70.
And it may have damaged the cause of organ donorship.
Zoe Pickering and Craig Williams, parents of hearttransplant baby Roman Williams, are backing the Mirror's campaign to change the law on organ donorship to an opt-out system.
Description : In line with the Good Humanitarian Donorship (GHD) principles, Switzerland recognizes the necessity of predictable and flexible funding to respond to changing needs in humanitarian crises.