dominant

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dominant

 [dom´ĭ-nant]
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes; see dominant gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.
dominant side the half of the body in which a person is stronger; writing and eating are usually done with the hand on the dominant side. See also handedness.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt),
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. In genetics, denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

/dom·i·nant/ (dom´ĭ-nant)
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3. a dominant allele or trait.

dominant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
2. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
3. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

[dom′inənt]
Etymology: L, dominari, to rule
1 exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2 in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3 in coronary artery anatomy, supplying the posterior diaphragmatic part of the interventricular septum and the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle; said of the right and left coronary arteries.

dominant

Genetics
noun A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive.
 
Autosomal dominant disorders
Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington’s disease.

Sexology
adjective, noun Top; Referring to the person, or the person him- or herself, who takes the active or controlling role in a BDSM relationship, which contrasts to the submissive (bottom) position or role.

dominant

Genetics A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive Dominant disorders Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington's disease. See Filial generation, Homozygote, Trait. Cf Recessive.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt)
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. genetics Denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

See DOMINANCE.

dominant

1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence; in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
2. a dominant allele or trait. If a defect, appearance in all heterozygotes and homozygotes tends toward the trait being self-limiting because of culling or death. See also gene, dominance.

dominant X-linked inheritance
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