Dominant trait

dom·i·nant trait

an outstanding mental or physical characteristic. See: dominance of traits.

dom·i·nant trait

(dom'i-nănt trāt)
An outstanding mental or physical characteristic.
See: dominance of traits

Dominant trait

A genetic trait in which one copy of the gene is sufficient to yield an outward display of the trait; dominant genes mask the presence of recessive genes; dominant traits can be inherited from a single parent.
References in classic literature ?
His dominant trait was clearly the remnant of still earlier days, because I've never seen such staring solemnity as Fyne's except in a very young baby.
His dominant trait was to take all things into earnest consideration.
It is estimated that 10% of all cases are thought to be inherited as a dominant trait, or otherwise known as Familial ALS (FALS.) Approximately 15 to 20 percent of FALS cases are caused by mutations in the gene that produces the copper zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) enzyme, which leads to a progressive degeneration of motor neurons affecting movement and muscle control.
Aside from these two terms, this group is also known as net generation, because they have grown up in an environment where they are exposed to digital-based technology, and generation me, because of their dominant trait of being self-centered.
The PL muscle is an inherited autosomal dominant trait. The absence of the PL muscle is probably connected with a single dominant gene (which shows incomplete penetration and variable expressivity), and/or absence is due to the effects of mutations (12).
The larger beak was the dominant trait, so two small-billed parents could only have small-billed offspring, but if either parent had a large bill, their offspring would have a mix of large and small bills, perfectly matching the 3:1 pattern predicted by Gregor Mendel centuries ago.
Lenning exhibited why he has been the best three-wall player in the last decade by showcasing his most dominant trait: his serve.
Barring is a dominant trait, carried by a gene on the male, or Z sex chromosome.
However on the phenotype account, considering dominant trait, all (100%) offspring will be affected being either (1) or (2) whereas for recessive trait, there will be 50% chance of being affected (2) and 50% chance of being normal but carrier of affected allele (1) (Figs.
PPPK is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, although acquired cases can be seen.
TSC, an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance, can adversely affect maternal and fetal outcome.
XLH is the most common heritable form of rickets (the softening and weakening of bones) that is inherited as an X-linked dominant trait affecting both males and females.