dominant idea


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idea

 [i-de´ah]
a mental impression or conception.
autochthonous idea a persistent idea, originating within the mind, usually from the unconscious, but seeming to have come from an outside source and often therefore felt to be of malevolent origin.
dominant idea one that controls or colors every action and thought.
fixed idea a persistent morbid impression or belief that cannot be changed by reason.
overvalued idea a false or exaggerated belief sustained beyond logic or reason but with less rigidity than a delusion, also often being less patently unbelievable.
idea of reference the incorrect idea that the words and actions of others refer to one's self, or the projection of the causes of one's own imaginary difficulties upon someone else.

dom·i·nant i·de·a

an idea that governs all one's actions and thoughts.

dom·i·nant i·de·a

(dom'i-nănt ī-dē'ă)
An idea that governs all one's actions and thoughts.

dominant idea

An idea that controls all one's actions and thoughts.
See also: idea
References in periodicals archive ?
Maintaining his central, 'dominant idea' position--"I endeavour to rid the mind at once of all ideas but one, and to fix that one in the mind even after passing into the hypnotic state" (Braid, 1843, p.
Dimmock's study follows a connecting thread of anti-Turkish demonization through the texts, and he concludes that the textual record from the reign of Henry VIII to the end of the century "reveal[s] how profoundly ingrained the central tenets of a dominant idea of the 'turke' in English culture remained, complicated by political and mercantile circumstance yet broadly unchanged from that cultivated by More and Tyndale in the 1520s" (195).
Viewing the history of the Left as a history of people creating such spaces of freedom is part of McKay's alternative to the dominant idea that the Left is "the dead, unlamented pipe dream of the twentieth century" (23) and to what he calls the sectarian and sentimental or scorecard approach to the history of the Left, in which writers defend the correctness of a particular political tendency.
The rhizomatic challenges the dominant idea of knowledge acquisition that remains so prominent in education, Mainstream knowledge acquisition is viewed as a form of recognition and linear progression, where the metaphor is a tree or a staircase, where you have to take the first step before you move to the next in order.
Even readers sympathetic to Rosser's structural approach would agree that ideas do matter, and the dominant idea of the times was that markets work better than states.
Buchanan's ideal of a justice-based international order calls for the priority of justice over international peace, in contrast to the dominant idea that the goal of the international system should be peace among nations, which may leave room for gross injustices within states.
Reform, although the dominant idea of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England, emphatically asserts itself in just one of these works--Burns' and Innes' Rethinking the Age of Reform.
By the third quarter of the nineteenth century, however, the "come-outer movement" that had distinguished itself by espousing the heretical and feared doctrine of universal salvation, succumbed to the culturally dominant idea of moral seriousness and cultivation of the self.
[45] Usually they contain a hierarchy of ideational elements with one dominant idea and at least one main challenger.
He makes a powerful case against the dominant idea that the market is the best arbiter of social, political, and cultural change.