dominant hemisphere


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hemisphere

 [hem´ĭ-sfēr]
half of a spherical or roughly spherical structure or organ.
cerebral hemisphere one of the paired structures constituting the largest part of the brain, which together comprise the extensive cerebral cortex, centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, and rhinencephalon, and contain the lateral ventricle. See also brain.
cerebellar hemisphere either of the paired portions of the cerebellum lateral to the vermis.
dominant hemisphere the cerebral hemisphere that is more concerned than the other in the integration of sensations and the control of many functions. See also laterality.

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

that cerebral hemisphere containing the representation of speech and controlling the arm and leg used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left hemisphere.

dominant hemisphere

Neurology That portion of the brain involved in guiding activities requiring manual dexterity; for those who are right-handed, the left hemisphere is dominant

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

(dom'i-nănt hem'is-fēr')
That cerebral hemisphere containing the representation of speech and controlling the arm and leg used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left hemisphere.

dominant hemisphere

The left half of the brain in almost all right-handed people and 85% of left-handed people. This is the hemisphere concerned with language and logical thought and containing the motor areas for voluntary use of the right side of the body. In 15% of left-handed people, the right hemisphere is dominant and subserves speech.

dom·i·nant hem·i·sphere

(dom'i-nănt hem'is-fēr')
Cerebral hemisphere containing representation of speech and controlling arms and legs used preferentially in skilled movements; usually the left.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the left hemisphere is indeed the location for pictorial encoding, then this raises the issue of whether covert verbal labeling of pictures (Paivio, 1971; Kunen, Green, and Waterman, 1979; Pezdek and Evans, 1979) facilitates subsequent recognition of them, because the left hemisphere is also the dominant hemisphere for semantic-memory retrieval (memory for meaning) from LTM.
Here, we hypothesized that the motor dominant hemisphere might in fact drive poststroke brain activity during action observation more strongly than the side of the stroke lesion.
We predicted that if action observation drives activity in the ipsilesional hemisphere, the right hemisphere stroke group should show greater activity in the right hemisphere, whereas if action observation drives activity in the motor dominant hemisphere, the right hemisphere stroke group should show greater activity in the left hemisphere.
Both stroke groups showed similar hemispheres by hand observed interactions, with brain activity lateralized toward the left motor dominant hemisphere, despite having lesions in different hemispheres.
Awake surgery for WHO Grade II gliomas within "noneloquent" areas in the left dominant hemisphere: toward a "supratotal" resection.
Ejection Ejection fraction [less fraction than or equal > 50% to] 50% Number of patients 13 27 Age (year) 67.08 [+ or 60.37 [+ or -] 6.4 -] 14.86 Gender (male/female) 7/6 14/13 Side of lesion Dominant hemisphere 8 13 Non-dominant hemisphere 5 14 Type of lesion Ischaemic 13 19 Hemorrhagic 0 8 Table 2.
Lesions in the dominant hemisphere (hemisphere contralateral to the dominant arm) produced deficits in the initial ballistic component of reaching but not in the secondary slower component [5-9,118-119].
directly tested the idea that dominant hemisphere lesions produce trajectory deficits and nondominant lesions produce deficits in the final position of targeted reaching movements [10].
The dominant hemisphere elicited (as expected) less neural activation related to contralateral limb movement than the nondominant hemisphere (Figure 3).