dominant


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Related to dominant: dominant gene

dominant

 [dom´ĭ-nant]
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes; see dominant gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.
dominant side the half of the body in which a person is stronger; writing and eating are usually done with the hand on the dominant side. See also handedness.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt),
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. In genetics, denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
2. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
3. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

Genetics
noun A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive.
 
Autosomal dominant disorders
Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington’s disease.

Sexology
adjective, noun Top; Referring to the person, or the person him- or herself, who takes the active or controlling role in a BDSM relationship, which contrasts to the submissive (bottom) position or role.

dominant

Genetics A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive Dominant disorders Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington's disease. See Filial generation, Homozygote, Trait. Cf Recessive.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt)
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. genetics Denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

See DOMINANCE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amongst 150 subjects, one female and one male was left handed and rest all had right hand as their dominant hand.
Caption: One way to practice for injury to your dominant shooting eye is to tape up that side of your shooting glasses, which forces you to use the other eye and prevents cheating.
The mean reciprocal ratios were calculated for both concentric and eccentric internal and external shoulder rotation on the dominant and non-dominant sides (Table 3).
Body height (BH) was measured with a stadiometer (Seca 220, Seca Corporation, Hamburg, Germany) while body mass, body mass index, dominant and non-dominant arm lean mass, dominant and non-dominant arm circumference, right and left leg lean mass, and right and left thigh circumference were measured with octopolar bioimpedance InBody 720 (Biospace, Seoul, Korea).
It's one thing to have a manipulative submissive, but it's a WHOLE different situation to have a manipulative Dominant. These types of Dominants are not someone you want to learn from and definitely not someone you want to play with.
In addition, the rank reversals that were observed could have resulted from the single losing experience of the dominant (after the previous win), "resetting" the dominant to subordinate status, and thus having two new subordinates re-forming a dominance relationship with equal opportunity for each animal to obtain higher rank.
Comparison of Scapular Resting Position in Racquet Players Between Dominant and Non-dominant Sides (a) Spino-Scapular Groups Distance, cm Dominant Side Non-Dominant Side At level of spine of 8.52 [+ or -] 1.38 8.34 [+ or -] 1.43 scapula At level of inferior 10.23 [+ or -] 1.43 9.86 [+ or -] 1.40 angle of scapula Spino-Scapular Groups Distance, cm P Value At level of spine of > 0.05 scapula At level of inferior < 0.05 angle of scapula (a) P values less than 0.05 are considered as significant.
Conceptual Framework: Dominant Parties and Dominant-Party Systems
De Lima said the Comelec should have determined first the political parties belonging to the administration and opposition blocs before choosing which among these groups should be considered the 'dominant' majority and minority parties as defined under the election laws.
De Lima stressed that the election laws used the terms "dominant opposition party", "dominant opposition coalition", and "dominant minority party", to refer to the party opposite the majority party.