dominance hierarchy


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dom·i·nance hi·er·ar·chy

a social situation in which one organism dominates all below it, the next all below it, and so on down to the organism dominated by all; for example, the pecking order in apes, seals, barnyard hens, and other species.

dominance hierarchy

a phenomenon in animal societies where some members are subordinate to others, giving a reproductive advantage to the less subordinate members. see PECKING ORDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
Top dogs in a pack are known to assert their dominance, but scientists from the University of Exeter (UK) and the Veterinary Service of the Local Health Unit Rome 3 (Italy) studied a group of free-roaming mongrels and found high levels of aggression in the middle of the dominance hierarchy. Most theories predict more aggression higher up the ladder.
Social interactions are often nested within the context of a dominance hierarchy. By imaging two mice in a competitive social interaction, they discovered that behavior of the dominant animal drives synchrony more strongly than behavior of the subordinate animal.
There is a definite pecking order, or dominance hierarchy, in these flocks.
Even within real estate, certain communities emerge by having a social dominance hierarchy over others, for reasons that have nothing to do with economics.
Attempting to use a simple dominance hierarchy model to explain all things wolf (and dog) has fallen short when considering new evidence that supports the existence of complex thought, planning, perspective taking, and even rudimentary elements of a "theory of mind" in animals, including wolves and dogs.
Establishing the dominance hierarchy of these constraints, we can account for monosyllabic words of different forms.
Complicating matters just slightly is that we must also factor the dominance hierarchy and social stress into our simple equation.
Although the primary function of sexual courtship is to advertise fitness to prospective mates (Andersson, 1994), conspicuous displays can also serve to establish a dominance hierarchy among individuals of the same sex (Mateos and Carranza, 1999; Parker and Ligon, 2002; Vergara and Martinez-Padilla, 2012).
Patterns of neural circuit activation and behavior during dominance hierarchy formation in freely behaving crayfish.
Testosterone can co-vary with dominance hierarchy, but not in all species under all conditions.
Individual recognition and the dominance hierarchy in the domesticated pig.
Key words: sociality, sibling rivalry, dominance hierarchy, urine