domiciliary

(redirected from domicile)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

domiciliary

(dŏm″ĭ-sĭl′ē-ār″ē) [L. domus, house]
Pert. to or conducted in a house.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Those living in Karachi all their lives have the right to have Karachi's domicile,' remarked Justice Shah.
His domicile remains to be that in Barangay Bagumbayan, which has been his domicile from 1991 up to the present," it said.
In the case of Cayetano, Comelec said Serendra only serves as his residence, while his home in Bagumbayan remains his domicile.
"Based on the foregoing, there should be no confusion, to begin with as to the Civil Code pertains to residence as mere actual residence and not domicile as it is understood in election law and as used to determine residency for qualification purposes...
Knowing how states reach domicile determinations can help taxpayers and their advisors plan accordingly.
To determine change of domicile, New York state takes the position that there must be clear and convincing evidence to determine from the "primary factors" that there has been a change of domicile.
The unit visited Shaheen Muslim Town and provided domiciles to the applicants.
They demanded of the authorities to take serious notice and cancel the local and domicile certificates issued after January 14, 2019.
If you are a UK resident, then you will pay income tax in the UK and my understanding (I say my understanding because I am not a tax expert and anything that you do regarding domicile and residence should be checked with an appropriately qualified individual) is that you will be treated as a UK resident for tax purposes if you spend more than 183 days in the country during the tax year.
Future development of captive domiciles depends on regulations, tax codes and being seen as a tool to mitigate and control risks.
An individual may decide to change domicile from New York to Florida for various reasons, including: personal reasons, such as proximity to family, retirement, health issues, new job or a change in climate; tax reasons, such as moving from a state with income and estate taxes, (e.g., New York) to a state without income and estate taxes (e.g., Florida); and asset protection reasons, such as homestead and tenancy by the entirety protections in Florida.
candidates studying in big cities get domicile of cities having a low literacy rate and get admission in the favorite universities.