domesticate

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domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relationship between domestication and evolution is much discussed (van Raamsdonk, 1993).
One limitation of the study is its lack of ancient DNA analysis, leading some dog domestication researchers to question the results.
Although Qabrestan is far from Eastern Anatolia and Central Zagros where the most evidence of goat domestication and herding exist (e.g.
This difference suggests that the behaviors of the domestication syndrome have been decoupled during dog domestication.
Liberia is pushing strongly for the domestication of the conventions.
By 6,500 years ago, the partially domesticated plant had arrived in a region of the southwest Amazon that was already a domestication hotspot, where people were growing rice, cassava and other crops.
In this light, how might domestication fit into this evolution of what is considered beautiful (and behaviorally preferable)?
It resulted from humans' first efforts at domestication from those associated with the development of specific breeds.
This is the question that begins Global Manga: "Japanese" Comics Without Japan?, edited by Casey Brienza, which is developed further in Brienza's subsequent book, Manga in America: Transnational Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics.
Understanding crop domestication and diversification processes is important to infer the origin of the crop and highlight the history of human civilizations.
In (https://www.utoronto.ca/news/archaeologists-find-earliest-evidence-winemaking-0) a statement Monday, Stephen Batiuk of the university, who coauthored a research paper on the subject, said: "We believe this is the oldest example of the domestication of a wild-growing Eurasian grapevine solely for the production of wine."
Since their domestication from their wild ancestor, the wolf, to the pets we have today, dogs have developed a unique ability to work together with humans.