domesticate

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domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kojo Ross says domesticating the law means localizing it in the context of Liberia.
For example, copies of checks you received showing where the debtor holds a bank account is especially helpful in quickening the process of domesticating a judgment.
The second element in theocapitalism's theology of culture is a domesticating tolerance.
The priesthood scandals showed that a homosexual presence in an established institution did in fact result in the undermining of traditional sexual morality, rather than domesticating the homosexuals.
Selfdomestication was thought of as what happened when hominids became culture-using, culture-building life forms: what they came to be able to do to and for themselves was parallel to what they would later do to and for animals, in domesticating them.
Hunter-gatherers in Europe were the first people to have dogs as pet, domesticating them around 18,000 years ago.
For many years, historians and scientists assumed that the Incas had created both the llamas and alpacas by domesticating the guanaco, which is larger and more widely distributed than the vicuna.
Domesticating Drink: Women, Men, and Alcohol in America, 1870-1940.
For decades, most scientists assumed that humanity picked up tapeworms while domesticating cattle and pigs some 10,000 years ago, explains Eric P.