domesticate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the Asians and Europeans began to domesticate and live at close quarters with large mammals, they caught their diseases--smallpox, tuberculosis and measles from cattle, for example.
One thing that remains to be uncovered is if the Egyptians' domesticated cats on their own or used the animals that other people began to domesticate in the neighboring region of the Near East.
By better understanding the history of the animals we domesticate, we can better understand ourselves." Decker also said that cattle-breeding is important for animal farmers looking to maximize their herds' meat and dairy production.
Several weeks ago, Parvanov wrote on his Facebook page that he is taking care of the 2-year old she-wolf in the State Boyana residence, bragging "no human in history had been able to domesticate a wolf while I am raising one together with a sheepdog of the Bulgarian Karakachan breed."
We know from archaeological remains that the wild ancestors of modern-day cattle, known as aurochs, were common throughout Asia and Europe, so there would have been plenty of opportunities to capture and domesticate them."
Researchers have long suspected that the Botai rode domesticated horses while hunting for wild horses to eat but did not domesticate other animals or cultivate crops.