dogbane


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dogbane

see apocynumcannabinum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jamming bat echolocation: the dogbane tiger moth Cycnia tenera times its clicks to the terminal attack calls of the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus.
Plant-butterfly interactions in South-central Idaho sorted by plant family (alphabetical) with dates, 2003-2007 Plant (common Plant Family name, (Scientific Use introduced) Name) Apocynaceae Dogbane Apocynum Nectar androsaemifolium L.
The oblate shape of yellowing dogbane leaves is reminiscent of a Zulu warrior's shield.
This volume covers the more dominant leadwort (41 species) and gentian (111 species) but also includes olive, butterfly-bush, buck-bean, dogbane, and milkweed.
No substitute meets with everyone's approval, nor does any other word communicate as well a "people of ceremony," "conspicuous elegance," and "excess consideration"; a wayfaring culture of astronomers, mathematicians, corn growers, monument builders, merchants, weavers, and "multiple ethnicities," with "a smell of empire" about it after a thousand years of wars and migrations; and "a place in time when a civilization danced across this desert like rain," leaving behind turquoise and turkey feathers, finger rings and foot drums, watchtowers and relay stations, wooden buttons the silvery blue of a night moth and pouches woven out of dogbane.
SPRUCE Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) THIMBLEBERRY Common Red Paintbrush PAINTBRUSH (Castilleja miniata) Black Twinberry TWINBERRY (Lonicera involucrata) Spreading Dogbane DOGBANE (Apocynum androsaemifolium) Lupine (Lurpinus sp.
2000) found that the patches of perennial weeds like hemp dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum L.
The third, Tabernaemontana rotensis, a small tree in the dogbane family (Apocynaceae), occurs on Rota and the U.
Family Name (Latin and Common): Apocynaceae, the Dogbane family
Henry de Laszlo and Paul Henshaw reported in 1954 that Indians used oral contraceptives including the boiled roots of dogbane or wild ginger, beverages made from milkweed, arum, Indian paintbrush, or rosemary, and the dried roots of thistle, squaw root, and the Mexican wild yam.
I was relieved when Thomson drew my attention to the sage and dogbane at my feet and a waxwing posing on a ripe red soapberry bush nearby.
The red blossoms and nectar of the oleander (member of the dogbane family) are so toxic even the insects avoid them; its wood, on a cooking fire, is poisonous.