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document

Informatics
noun
(1) A bundle of information that is a common currency for groupware communication, including text and relevant formatting details, graphics, audio and video.
(2) An ordered presentation of XML elements, possibly including text and tabular analyses, descriptions and figures. In HL7, a document can be either a physical entity (e.g., paper) or a logical entity (e.g., content), and is defined by certain parameters:
• Stewardship;
• Potential for authentication;
• Wholeness;
• Human readability;
• Persistence;
• Context.

Managed care
noun See Informed consent document.
 
verb To formally record information, usually in a permanent, legally acceptable fashion, and usually as written and/or signed notes, order forms, and others.

Online
noun Any aggregate of data, either on paper or in an electronic format; a document may be handwritten or typed, have illustrations and graphics, and may be legally binding.
 
Trials
noun See Source document.

document

noun Online Any aggregate of data, whether it is on paper or in an electronic format; a document may be handwritten or typed, have illustrations and graphics, and may be legally binding verb Health care To formally record information, usually in a permanent, legally acceptable fashion, usually as written and/or signed notes, order forms, and others. See Documentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Information management professionals will find the process master methodology useful when documenting processes in a records management program.
By collecting the right evidence and documenting specific characteristics displayed by subjects, investigators can help the courts ensure that the needs of society are served, as the rights of the mentally insane are protected.
If they devote resources to documenting internal controls and go bankrupt, we would probably all agree they focused on the wrong thing.
Even an informal note documenting a brief telephone conversation with names and a date can sway a jury in the CPA's favor.
Part II focuses on the steps to be taken after obtaining CD-ROM search results, including analyzing the initial results, modifying the search request when necessary, deciding when to conclude research and documenting results.