doctor-nurse game

A popular term for the complex relationship between physicians and nurses

doctor-nurse game

The complex 'pas de deux' between physician and nurses. See Nurse practitioner, Physician extender.
References in periodicals archive ?
The informal strategies used were the doctor-nurse game frequently described in past literature, organizational work-arounds, circumnavigation of directives, and direct confrontation.
The second strategy involves engaging in what one authority has called the doctor-nurse game, in which a nurse's treatment recommendations are followed by the doctor but her role in providing advice remains unacknowledged.
Jameton (1984) referred to the doctor-nurse game as "a gender-role game translated into occupational terms" (p.
The doctor-nurse game represents an effective solution to the moral dilemma presented by the nurse's traditional duty both to provide patient care and to follow the physician's orders, even when the physician himself is in need of advice.
Jameton (1984) suggested that the nurse who plays the doctor-nurse game actually might be more autonomous than the nurse who overtly challenges a physician's instructions because the nurse who makes open suggestions is at risk of rebuke and loss of influence.
They also offer a counter to oppressed group behaviour--horizontal violence, the doctor-nurse game, not speaking up and not getting involved.
This encourages continuation of the doctor-nurse game which reinforces physician dominance, even though nurses at all levels hold significant informal power and influence over diagnosis and treatment decisions (Allen, 1997; Campbell-Heider & Pollock, 1987).
As Victorian days faded and times changed, so did the doctor-nurse game.
In 1990, a study in the United States revisited the doctor-nurse game and acknowledged changes had occurred.