doctor-nurse game

A popular term for the complex relationship between physicians and nurses

doctor-nurse game

The complex 'pas de deux' between physician and nurses. See Nurse practitioner, Physician extender.
References in periodicals archive ?
The informal strategies used were the doctor-nurse game frequently described in past literature, organizational work-arounds, circumnavigation of directives, and direct confrontation.
In the immediate post-war era many nurses had been trained to participate in what Leonard Stein called the "doctor-nurse game." The "game" was that "nurses provided help, information, recommendations, and even criticism, but in a covert manner that never challenged physicians' authority." (94) The development of nursing as an academic discipline had also opened the door for specialized nursing jobs, including "Nurse Practitioners" who took on tasks like monitoring blood pressure and heart rate in order to give doctors more time for diagnostics.
The second strategy involves engaging in what one authority has called the doctor-nurse game, in which a nurse's treatment recommendations are followed by the doctor but her role in providing advice remains unacknowledged.
Jameton (1984) referred to the doctor-nurse game as "a gender-role game translated into occupational terms" (p.
They also offer a counter to oppressed group behaviour--horizontal violence, the doctor-nurse game, not speaking up and not getting involved.
"The Doctor-Nurse Game Revisited." New England Journal of Medicine 322(8):546-9, Feb.
"The Doctor-Nurse Game." Archives of General Psychiatry 16:699-703, June 1967.
It has been described as "the doctor-nurse game", with the playing field often dominated by doctors who organise and referee the "players", ie nurses.
As Victorian days faded and times changed, so did the doctor-nurse game. Nurses could make recommendations but they had to appear to have been initiated by the doctor.
Stein's (1967) classic rendering of the "doctor-nurse game" depicted dominating doctors to whom nurses made diagnostic and treatment recommendations in a submissive manner, such that the recommendation appeared to have been initiated by the physician.