diverticulosis


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Related to diverticulosis: diverticulitis, irritable bowel syndrome

diverticulosis

 [di″ver-tik″u-lo´sis]
the presence of diverticula in the absence of inflammation. (See diverticulitis.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·ver·tic·u·lo·sis

(dī'vĕr-tik'yū-lō'sis),
Presence of a number of diverticula of the intestine, common in middle age; the lesions are acquired pulsion diverticula.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diverticulosis

(dī′vûr-tĭk′yə-lō′sĭs)
n.
A condition characterized by the presence of numerous diverticula in the colon.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

diverticulosis

The presence of multiple diverticula in the colon which, if inflamed/infected, is termed diverticulitis Clinical Sx, if present, include abdominal colic, constipation, diarrhea, bloating Diagnosis Colonoscopy, CT of abdomen Management High fiber diets may delay progression of diverticulosis or diverticulitis
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·ver·tic·u·lo·sis

(dī'vĕr-tik'ū-lō'sis)
Presence of a number of diverticula of the intestine; with increasing age, the condition is more generally found.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diverticulosis

(dī″vĕr-tĭk″ū-lō′sĭs) [″ + Gr. osis, condition]
Enlarge picture
DIVERTICULOSIS, SEEN ENDOSCOPICALLY
Diverticula in the colon without inflammation or symptoms. Only a small percentage of persons with diverticulosis develop diverticulitis. See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

diverticulosis

A condition in which many sac-like protrusions (diverticula) occur in the large intestine (colon).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Diverticulosis

A condition where pouchlike sections that bulge through the large intestine's muscular walls but are not inflamed occur. They may cause bleeding, stomach distress, and excess gas.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Patient discussion about diverticulosis

Q. What corn based products can I eat. I have diverticular disease. I love corn tortillas, corn bread, corn dogs.

A. The dietary recommendations for people with diverticular disease of the colon are usually to add fibers-rich foods (fruits, vegetables etc.). As far as I know corn isn't especially rich in dietary fibers, so I don't know about any recommended corn-based foods, although I don't know about any recommendations to refrain from eating corn-based foods.

If you have any questions regarding this subject, you may consult your doctor. You may also read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/dietaryfiber.html

Q. How to prevent diverticulitis? I am a 43 year old man. I just had colonoscopy and my Doctor said I have diverticulosis and am at risk in developing diverticulitis. How can I prevent developing diverticulitis?

A. You have Diverticulosis, which means you have diverticulas (small pouches) on your digestive system. These diverticula are permanent and will not go away. No treatment has been found to prevent complications of diverticular disease. Diet high in fiber increases stool bulk and prevents constipation, and theoretically may help prevent further diverticular formation or worsening of the diverticular condition. Some doctors recommend avoiding nuts, corn, and seeds which can plug diverticular openings and cause diverticulitis. Whether avoidance of such foods is beneficial is unclear. If you develop unexplained fever, chills or abdominal pain, you should notify your doctor immediately since it could be a complication of diverticulitis.

More discussions about diverticulosis
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References in periodicals archive ?
You may not even know that you have diverticulosis until you have a colonoscopy or other bowel exam.
The researchers conclude that the age-old advice for people with diverticulosis to avoid corn, nuts and popcorn should be reexamined.
About 25 percent of people with diverticulosis develop diverticulitis.
Low-Fiber Diet Implicated Diverticulosis is thought to result from a diet that is high in animal fat and low in fiber (the condition is far less common in countries where people eat low-meat, high-fiber diets).
The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to determine the incidence of complicated DD in patients with incidental diverticulosis identified in a previous prospective cross-sectional screening colonoscopy study in average-risk patients, originally designed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of colorectal neoplasia as well as diverticulosis [11,12].
Bodai, "Enterolith ileus resulting from small bowel diverticulosis," The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
El enema de bario permite realizar el diagnostico en la mayoria de los casos debido a que muestra la comunicacion entre el DCG y el colon pues el contraste ingresa dentro del ostium, ademas, permite la visualizacion de diverticulosis asociada (Figura 7) (14).
The reason for bleeding was identified as diverticulosis in eight of 12 patients (66.
The patient was treated medically, and diverticulosis was confirmed by colonoscopy.
Although a diagnosis of diverticulosis can be easily made by colonoscopy, acute diverticulitis is in general a contraindication for endoscopic examination owing to the high risk for perforation, and thus, should be delayed by 3-4 weeks.