divagation

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Related to divagations: get on, consoler, the likes of, undeterred, overhyped

divagation

 [di″vah-ga´shun]
incoherent or wandering speech and thought.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

divagation

(dī-vă-gā′shŭn) [L. divagatus, to wander off]
1. Wandering astray.
2. Rambling or incoherent speech.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(9) Unsurprisingly, it can be difficult to identify a structure or organizing principle beneath so much divagation. Faced with the narrative equivalent of an unbridled and overwhelming natural space, the reader's reaction to Montalbetti's novel is much the same as it would be to a boundless expanse of physical space.
As if to enlarge what Oppen is driving at, Schwerner comments in Tablets Journals / Divagations that
"Remarking Bodies: Divagations of Morrison from Faulkner." Faulkner, His Contemporaries, and His Posterity.
(The New York Film Festival, inaugurated in 1964 and headed by Richard Roud, was another salient promoter of that "advanced European cinema"; Sontag served as a member of its selection committee for two years in the mid-sixties.) "It is the critical faculty that invents fresh forms"--Wilde again in "The Critic as Artist." The "fresh form" embodied by Sontag's literary/philosophical divagations in AI I have already limned; but that "invented" by her film criticism in the same volume was equally arresting.
Because of the dizzying divagations of his political course, occasioned by his numerous, abrupt ideological about-faces, Macdonald frequently wasn't seen as a serious political mind but was instead regarded as something of a jokester.
The angry tone of his letter intensified as he turned his attention to Saint-Denis himself: I do not wish to defend myself, but to attack; to attack before departure, and to attack these boneless dreary divagations from principle.
(Indeed, the divagations of the Times form a revealing object lesson in the extent to which the earnest, fueled by the emotion of virtue, is often the enemy of the genuinely serious.)
Originally published in French in the National Observer of Edinburgh on October 29, 1892, (5) reprinted in the Revue Blanche of December 1892, and collected in Mallarme's Divagations of 1897 and thereafter in his Oeuvres computes (pp.
Does Conley, however, really need to prepare his reader for the divagations of his exposition by 1) citing an off-heard, now cliched joke about the paranoia of psychologists and 2) invoking Pascal's metaphorical wager in a florid metonymical pastiche that attributes to contemporary editorial endeavors "a secular version of this soul-shaking gambit" (60)?
With McClinton seemingly preoccupied in trying to reconcile the stylistic divagations of the text, it's hardly surprising the performances are uneven.
Steele's teleological point of view flattens out the complexities and divagations of historical circumstances.