divagation


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divagation

 [di″vah-ga´shun]
incoherent or wandering speech and thought.

divagation

(dī-vă-gā′shŭn) [L. divagatus, to wander off]
1. Wandering astray.
2. Rambling or incoherent speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet in spite of, or because of, all this, Calcutta is also a city with its own particular spleen, which Chaudhuri (a reverent if still reluctant denizen rather than a full-fledged, pukka citizen) pursues through a montage of personal memories, domestic scenes, street conversations, parlor interviews, gourmand explorations and divagations, literary references and bits of historical information, and family history.
Moreover, the whole first part of the poem is filled with divagations about the condition of historiography, especially in its national variant.
The first two of these novels foreground the stream-of-consciousness Faulkner, the writer who fashioned a kind of neural discourse, indeed neural poetry, that was new to American literature: the tortured divagations of idiot Benjy and suicidal Quentin and son-of-a-bitch Jason Compson, each delivering his painful aria to Caddy who loved and left; and the in-the-deep and on-the-fly renditions of traumatized Bundrens: Dari the precarious one who invades others with his vision, Vardaman the unhinged child, Cash the homespun raisonneur, Dewey Dell with growing seed, Jewel the primitive and pure.
Kishik's book tries to reflect faithfully the theoretical and methodological tenets of Agamben's philosophy, including its quasi-aphoristic style and a proclivity for erudite divagations.
Mallarme's most sustained commentary on theater and dance is known today under the title Crayonne au Theatre, a series of twelve polished essays first published in 1896 as part of his prose collection Divagations, and which gained canonical status as a self-standing literary artifact when it was included in the 1945 Pleiade edition of Mallarme's complete works.
Certains se lancent dans la deviation, le crime, l'addiction et sont entraEnes par les divagations des groupes fondamentalistes, le porte-parole d'Allah.
Dans un essai intitule "Quant au livre" publie dans les Divagations, Mallarme a inclus une rubrique "Ecrire":
The warren of streets that leads the poet towards the creative center, his many divagations en route, the incessant thump of longing, the crests and troughs of desire, all come to the fore when one pores into the poetic oeuvre of the latest Padma Shri awardee from Punjab, the poet Surjit Patar.
MALCOLM X: A LIFE OF REINVENTION is a painstaking reconstruction of his many divagations.
Few poets have ever so invested themselves in intricate, idiosyncratic form (I am not talking the obviousness of verse here), and its maneuvers invite sudden shifts of direction, interesting subjects, abrupt divagations, patience coupled with a readiness for surprise, all necessary to the adept of the field.
Katz has a greater affinity with the Frenchman than he does with the Spaniard: the continuity of Matisse's style is of a kind with Katz's, while Picasso's divagations are united only by the curiosity behind their effects.
Contemptuous of the dumbing down of culture, Kitaj presupposed the existence of an intelligent and intellectually curious audience willing to meet him halfway in his divagations through painting into areas of human experience habitually assumed to be outside the realm of painting.