disuse syndrome

disuse syndrome

 [dis-ūs´]
deterioration of body systems as a result of prescribed or unavoidable inactivity. See also hazards of immobility.
risk for disuse syndrome a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for deterioration of body systems owing to prescribed or unavoidable musculoskeletal inactivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disuse syndrome, first described in 1984 by Bortz involves effects of sedentary life on physical and human psyche, being responsible for altering health as well.
Keywords: lumbar disk hernia, sustained loading of the spine, disuse syndrome, patient activism implementation
Other risks caused by use of assistive robots are not considered, for example, the risk of a disuse syndrome [8] which is the reduction of activities derived from excessive assistance by robots.
Does the high performance robot have possibility of being a cause of the disuse syndrome?
Patients were categorized into three condition groups: stroke, orthopedic disease, and disuse syndrome. The stroke group included patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, or intracranial hemorrhage.
To analyze the data in diagnostic groups, we divided patients into three groups based on the following diagnoses: stroke, orthopedic disorders, and disuse syndrome. Disuse syndrome is a type of hypoactivity with musculoskeletal inactivity, which results in depletion of body systems and is typically associated with mechanical or prescribed immobilization, severe pain, and/or an altered level of consciousness [20].
In a paper called "The Disuse Syndrome" in the Western Journal of Medicine, Bortz stated that six common conditions all trace a major part of their causation to lack of fitness.
He did the same last year.] He coined the term "Disuse Syndrome" 30 years ago after his leg was casted for a short period of time.
Impaired physical mobility, immobility, and disuse syndrome are terms that are sometimes used to describe deconditioning.
Some of them reported that fractures due to falls were significantly more common in a PD group (15%) than the corresponding control group (7.5%), and the commonest site of fractures in the PD group was the femur, wile it was the forearm in the control group .The risk of fracture was significantly increased in PD relative to the control group, and hip fractures can cause disuse syndrome, impairment of ADL and poor quality of life (QOL).
These were subsequently aggregated into the Disuse Syndrome the components of which are (a) cardiovascular vulnerability, (b) musculoskeletal fragility, (c) metabolic instability, (d) immunologic susceptibility, (e) CNS compromise, and (f) precocious aging, frailty (4).
Several decades of intensive inquiry abetted by expansive technological effort, however, have yielded little insight into a genetic base for aging and disuse and the other components of the Disuse Syndrome. Failure of the single gene hypothesis to explain very much reflects the poverty of the reductionistic perspective.