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distribution

 [dis″trĭ-bu´shun]
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.
frequency distribution in statistics, a mathematical function that describes the distribution of measurements on a scale for a specific population.
normal distribution a symmetrical distribution of scores with the majority concentrated around the mean; for example, that representing a large number of independent random events. It is in the shape of a bell-shaped curve. Called also gaussian distribution. See illustration.
 Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated. From Dorland's, 2000.
probability distribution a mathematical function that assigns to each measurable event in a sample group the probability that the event will occur.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn),
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations such as in different age, gender, or occupational samples.
4. Partition.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between organelles, cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. distribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

distribution

(dĭs′trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The extension of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The geographic occurrence or range of an organism.
4. A characterization of the occurrence of the actual unique values in a set of data (as in a frequency distribution) or of the theoretical unique values of a random variable (as in a probability distribution).

dis′tri·bu′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

distribution

Medspeak
The location or site of predilecton of a lesion or process.

Pharmacology
The reversible transfer of a drug from one site to another in the body.
 
Statistics
A group of ordered values; the frequencies or relative frequencies of all possible values of a characteristic.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

distribution

Clinical medicine The pattern of involvement of a tissue by a particular condition. See Batwing distribution, Fat distribution, Mocassin distribution, Stocking & glove distribution Epidemiology The frequency and pattern of health-related characteristics and events in a population Pharmacology The location–eg intravascular or extravascular of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination; disposition includes both the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose concentration versus time curve. See Disposition, Elimination.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. Passage of an agent through blood or lymph to body sites remote from the site(s) of contact and absorption; thus called systemic distribution.
4. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations, such as in different age, sex, or occupational samples.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

distribution

the occurrence of a species over the total area in which it occurs, i.e. its range or geographical distribution. In aquatic organisms or soil organisms, or even organisms living on mountains, vertical distribution is also important. In some organisms vertical distribution may vary seasonally, as does geographical distribution, particularly in migratory forms. See also FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. Passage of branches of arteries or nerves to tissues and organs.
2. Area in which branches of an artery or a nerve terminate or area supplied by such artery or nerve.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cheng (2007).New species and new distributional records of the genus Paragus Latreille (Diptera, Syrphidae) from China.Volucella, 8: 1-33.
The study showed that models for virtual species that were Wallace's Dream or All Fine configurations were rarely able to anticipate distributions of species better than random predictions--we note that those distributional situations are not at all rare, and yet many ENM studies have calibrated models for such species, and interpreted their implications, with unknown consequences (e.g.
To consolidate the research efforts, [7] organized a shared task on Distributional Semantics and Compositionality (DISCo), and provided datasets in English and German with human compositionality judgments.
Distributional records of endemic mammals of China are derived from China Species Information Service (http://www.baohu.org/) and literature related to the mammalian fauna of China (Wang 2003; Smith and Xie 2008).
Thus even in the current policy the government seems to worry a lot about the concerns of distributional justice' by putting efforts to increase enrolment however not taking any serious measure to break divisive education structure beyond rhetoric.
The distributional concerns, particularly in the form of loss spreading, that animate legal-realist arguments for strict products liability play no role in Coase's formulation of the problem of social costs because, as an exponent of neoclassical economics, particularly of the University of Chicago sort, distributional matters are outside the scope of economic science.
A full assessment of the distributional impact of fiscal policy must account for the impact of changes to spending and taxes that contribute to the deficit, as well as that of the accumulated debt.
Then we examine the distributional impacts of free allocation under conditions where the opportunity costs of free allowances can and cannot be passed on to purchasers of products generating the emissions.
Thus, they showed that distributional learning can not only collapse an existing distinction but can facilitate learning of difficult distinctions as well (Maye et al., 2008).
We overlayed distributional records onto a digital model of elevation to estimate the northern distributional limit of pacas in northeastern Mexico (Fig.
Experience in developing and advanced countries alike suggests that states with substantial and healthy balance sheets are better positioned to deal with today's stability, distributional, and sustainability challenges.
The twin goals of excellence and equity should lead policy-makers to be interested in both the average effects of educational policies and their distributional consequences.

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