couplet

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cou·plet

(kŭp'lĕt)
A series of two consecutive premature ventricular contractions.
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Volume II contains meticulously detailed commentaries on all the components of the Liber ymnorum, including the dedication and distich. Each entry for the sequences includes the text and translation for the Alleluia proper to the feast, a translation of the texts, with notes, and copious commentary on how the versus are presented in the manuscripts, the notation, and relevant bibliography.
This contrasts, moreover, with the exceptionally long and cluttered first line of the distich: "The old man, the child, the goose feathers at the edge of the forest." "I see [...] And hear," Thomas writes.
(55) At this time, Felsenstein notes, 'the notorious distich "No Jews!
As a Paradoxist Distich is said to be a two-line poem, one content-word in each line is required at the least to form a distich.
The deinde that introduces the final distich leads us to believe that this image of Apollo between his mother and sister stands beyond the ivory doors, inside the temple.
As Wyke (2002, 123) notes about this comic incongruity, "In the pentameter verses pes signals ambiguously both human and metrical feet." Just as the disproportionate feet the Ovidian caricature is granted symbolize the unevenness of feet in the elegiac distich due to the interchange between dactyls and spondees, so too the pressure Marathus exercises upon his feet to adjust their size may refer metaphorically to the restrictions imposed by the meter and the need for short syllables--especially in the second half of the pentameter verses, as illustrated by the use of pedes in line 14.
famous distich, he described himself this way: My knowledge reached to the
(21.) GHA 1: 203 (my translation); first printed in 1820, the date of composition for "Metamorphosis of Animals" is rather uncertain; Trunz proposes near contemporaneity with Goethe's closely related didactic poem on the "Metamorphosis of Plants," written in June 1798, though a diary entry of 10 November 1806 has been construed as evidence of a far later composition for "Metamorphosis of Animals," a poem whose strictly hexametric form also differs considerably from the elegiac distich employed in "Metamorphosis of Plants." See Trunz's commentary (GHA 1: 616-19).
In the name Macedonia is the remembrance of the Balkans: from pop music to literature, from that memorable distich of Dado Topic about the land where the sun always shines to the first page of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, where Melquiades demonstrates "the eighth wonder of the learned alchemists of Macedonia."
Statistics may be hazardous when applied to such a faulty corpus, but if we first consider musical instruments and musicians, with the exception of the various occurrences in the Theognidea, (1) whose dating is neither uniform nor certain, in the extant elegies and iambi we only find a few isolated references, such as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in Hipponax 79.11, (2) lyres in Margites 1.3 and in Ion 32.1, (3) and an aulos player in a elegiac distich (ad.
(4) Frequent use of distich (old/young; sword/poetry) and hyperbole (hyakudai, literally, a hundred generations, for centuries, eternity) is also standard Sino-Japanese rhetoric although, ironically, superlatives are regarded here as women's predilection.