dissonance

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Related to dissonances: Dissonance theory

dissonance

 [dis´o-nans]
discord or disagreement.
cognitive dissonance anxiety or similar unpleasant feelings resulting from a lack of agreement between a person's established ideas, beliefs, and attitudes and some more recently acquired information or experience.

dis·so·nance

(di'sō-nans),
In social psychology and attitude theory, an aversive state which arises when an individual is minimally aware of inconsistency or conflict within himself. See: cognitive dissonance theory.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]

dissonance

the interference between sound waves of different pitches.

dis·so·nance

(di'sŏ-năns)
social psychology An aversive state that arises when a person is minimally aware of internal inconsistency or conflict.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the less harmonically specific D Ionian is conceded, then the sequence of dissonances in measures 7-9 becomes more easily comprehensible: while the [E.
Again, these independent dissonances are labeled M.
Intervals are categorized as tonal consonances (T), modal consonances (M), or dissonances (D).
The only dissonances are major sevenths, minor seconds, diminished fifths, and tritones--that is ics 1 and 6.
Festinger introduced the concept of cognitive dissonance, which refers to psychological conflict that occurs when an individual simultaneously holds incongruous attitudes and beliefs.
This concept of dissonance can be utilized in the cindynic hyperspace.
S": Statistical dissonance, or a change in the statistical database.
He is most engaging when he casts a wider analytical net and considers the role of metrical dissonance in relation to form, expression, and style.
Despite his notorious and frequently condemned antipathy toward jazz, Theodor Adorno nevertheless offers an indispensable glimpse of the role played by dissonance in acting as a kind of check on the more facile tendencies of harmony:
This sense that the aesthetics of dissonance implicitly undercuts the claims made in the name of a self-sufficient harmony is crucial for understanding the disaster of Spike Lee's use of the opening section of Coltrane's A Love Supreme for the soundtrack of Mo' Better Blues.
However, it is crucial to note not only that Trane's jarring tenor shouts immanently figure dissatisfaction with harmony's unattainability, but that through the juxtaposition of such moments of supreme dissonance with more obviously harmonic gestures, this music also marks the refusal to let the dream of harmonic reconciliation lapse in the face of the recognition that it is ultimately unattainable.
While we may tend to associate the idea of harmony with that of divinity itself - and actually figure divinity in terms of what we know of harmony - the fore-grounding of dissonance in Coltrane's work marks the strength of his refusal to "present something as actually reconciled which is not.