dissonance

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Related to dissonances: Dissonance theory

dissonance

 [dis´o-nans]
discord or disagreement.
cognitive dissonance anxiety or similar unpleasant feelings resulting from a lack of agreement between a person's established ideas, beliefs, and attitudes and some more recently acquired information or experience.

dis·so·nance

(di'sō-nans),
In social psychology and attitude theory, an aversive state which arises when an individual is minimally aware of inconsistency or conflict within himself. See: cognitive dissonance theory.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]

dis·so·nance

(di'sŏ-năns)
social psychology An aversive state that arises when a person is minimally aware of internal inconsistency or conflict.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the less harmonically specific D Ionian is conceded, then the sequence of dissonances in measures 7-9 becomes more easily comprehensible: while the [E.sub.5]-[A.sub.5] fourth at beat 5 of measure 7 can be understood as a passing sonority, the sequences of fourths and sevenths in measures 8-9 are not treated as functionally dependent on any consonant intervals.
Again, these independent dissonances are labeled M.
Intervals are categorized as tonal consonances (T), modal consonances (M), or dissonances (D).
The only dissonances are major sevenths, minor seconds, diminished fifths, and tritones--that is ics 1 and 6.
(7.) It can be argued that there are occasions in which consonances are seen as dependent on conceptually prior dissonances, but such occurrences are generally less common in tonal music.
This concept of dissonance can be utilized in the cindynic hyperspace.
* "S": Statistical dissonance, or a change in the statistical database.
He is most engaging when he casts a wider analytical net and considers the role of metrical dissonance in relation to form, expression, and style.
This sense that the aesthetics of dissonance implicitly undercuts the claims made in the name of a self-sufficient harmony is crucial for understanding the disaster of Spike Lee's use of the opening section of Coltrane's A Love Supreme for the soundtrack of Mo' Better Blues.
Composed just prior to the period when Coltrane turned decisively to a thoroughgoing exploration of the idioms which have proved so unbearable to many listeners, A Love Supreme carefully juxtaposes relatively sparing yet profoundly intense discords with a startlingly intense drive toward harmonic reconciliation, and in such a way that we are able to hear a fully articulated, fully embodied expression of the idea that "dissonance is the truth about harmony." Moreover, Trane's strategically placed saxophonic cries bear out Adorno's assertion that such art is not about "the subjective pain and suffering" of the artist, so much as it heralds a harmony unattainable according to its own criteria.
While we may tend to associate the idea of harmony with that of divinity itself - and actually figure divinity in terms of what we know of harmony - the fore-grounding of dissonance in Coltrane's work marks the strength of his refusal to "present something as actually reconciled which is not." Coltrane refuses, in other words, to represent divine being as something that can be reconciled with the aesthetics of closure - of the cadenced march toward a seemingly final resolution - embodied in the very concept of harmony, and in the philosophical traditions which tend to invoke harmony's name.
Indeed, harmony's very inability fully to resolve the dissonance it is, in fact, predicated upon becomes, in Coltrane's masterworks, the precise evocation of a certain understanding of divinity itself.