dissonance


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dissonance

 [dis´o-nans]
discord or disagreement.
cognitive dissonance anxiety or similar unpleasant feelings resulting from a lack of agreement between a person's established ideas, beliefs, and attitudes and some more recently acquired information or experience.

dis·so·nance

(di'sō-nans),
In social psychology and attitude theory, an aversive state which arises when an individual is minimally aware of inconsistency or conflict within himself. See: cognitive dissonance theory.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]

dis·so·nance

(di'sŏ-năns)
social psychology An aversive state that arises when a person is minimally aware of internal inconsistency or conflict.
[L. dissonus, discordant, confused]
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to sway the cognitive dissonance in their favour, the incumbent BJP has tried its best to downplay its economic failures and sought to draw attention to India's supposed military strength, as the May 2019 elections approach.
As emotional dissonance is typically treated as a behavioral variable and is used to measure the extent of employees' discomfort with the mismatch of their felt versus displayed emotions, it is often the subject of job stress-related studies (Hahn, Binnewies, Sonnentag, & Mojza, 2011; Sonnentag & Fritz, 2015).
Implicitly, Bachelder's option to reduce if not eliminate cognitive dissonance in the corporate world is not to rationalize one's action to conform to the current belief or idea.
Next few paragraphs describe the specific variables used in the study that can allow researchers to use cognitive dissonance theory to explain the intentions of high water users to engage in water conservation behaviors.
At the conclusion of each talk, the interpreter posed one of three types of questions: a relevance question; a dissonance question; or a customary question (i.e., do you have any questions?).
A recent paper defines cognitive dissonance as "the idea that people find having inconsistent beliefs or making inconsistent choices to be uncomfortable, and take action to avoid this inconsistency or 'dissonance.'" (12) Another paper defines cognitive dissonance as "the desire of an individual to perceive himself or herself as a moral person," such that the "individual is motivated to reduce dissonance to alleviate this threat to self-concept and self-integrity." (13)
For conceptual change to take place, Strike and Posner posited that learners must experience cognitive dissonance within their current understandings to be "forced" to consider other explanations that are plausible, intelligible, and fruitful.
The study is based upon concepts that encompass cognitive dissonance theory, alongside with students' evaluation of teachers and courses.
In the current study, we qualitatively investigate the relationship between teacher beliefs and their associated teacher practices at two public elementary schools with diverse student populations through the theoretical perspective of cognitive dissonance. We argue that while teachers may hold theoretical beliefs about culturally proficient teaching, they may also hold deficit beliefs associated with pre-existing cognitions about the reasons for disparities in the academic outcomes of diverse student populations.
According to the authors, in the case of self-prophecies, behavioral induction would be explained by evoking scripts (Sherman, 1980), the activation of normative social identity (Perkins et al., 2008), and the reduction of cognitive dissonance (e.g., Spangenberg & Greenwald, 1999; Spangenberg et al., 2003, 2012).
Cognitive dissonance, a psychological discomfort, occurs when there is a discrepancy between what a person believes and information that calls this into question (Festinger, 1957).
Cognitive dissonance occurs when the brain recognizes it's holding two conflicting beliefs.