dissolute

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dissolute

adjective A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term meaning free of sexual inhibitions; it is not used in the working medical parlance.
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The results presented in Table 5 support the following inferences: (1) individuals in the "Amusement Seeker" cluster are particularly attracted to a theme of amazedness; (2) individuals in the "Dissoluteness Seeker" cluster do not appreciate any of the themes provided by the motel and react particularly strongly against the theme of amazedness; and (3) individuals belonging to the "Thrill Seeker" cluster are particularly attracted to a storyline theme.
The proof of Muhammad's dissoluteness is seen in the ethical system he created, which contrasted poorly with other moral codes of his day.
In Reflections, Burke ascribes political and social chaos and the laxity of French morals to the overthrow of the paternal authority that polices both male and female desire: "France, when she let loose the reins of regal authority, doubled the license of a ferocious dissoluteness in manners ...
(209) A pamphleteer in 1656 commented that few ministers "of good conversation would adventure thither," and those who came tended to be of a type that "could babble in a Pulpit, roare in a Tavern, exact from their Parishioners, and rather by their dissoluteness destroy, than feed, their Flocks." (210) A century later, the clergy of the established church in Virginia were described as "useless Lumber," whose negligence, irreligion, and immorality had "sunk them into just Contempt." (211)
(3) Though the bourgeois liberal is and has always been characterized as the prude repulsed by working-class rowdiness and dissoluteness, Orwell focuses almost exclusively on socialist snobbery.
It's not enough that the woman has given birth to the child under harsh, "white" conditions -- but she must overcome her own husband's dissoluteness (and, by extension, that of all men in her community) as well.
Of the three (sattva, rajas, and tamas), tamas or "darkness" is the quality of heaviness, opaqueness, envelopment, impenetrability, and obstruction--of inertia, lethargy, impotence, latency, and stagnation; of foolishness, dissoluteness, confusion, attachment, and ignorance--and is an attribute of being resulting from demeritorious karma in the past.
Like a consummate naturalist who has found there his most significant flora and fauna, Rousseau gives a picture of the dissoluteness of the city: 'La galanterie et les soins valent mieux que l'amour aupras [des femmes], et pourvu qu'il soit assidu, peu leur importe qu'on soit passionne.
Falstaff is sophistic again when, speaking as Prince Hal in the playlet, he verbally translates his own gluttony and dissoluteness to virtue: "If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked!
By making slave women seem excessively nurturing, abolitionist discourse counters the proslavery depiction of slave women's presumed irresponsibility and dissoluteness. The image of the too natural mother helps to discredit that of the unnatural mother; the image of native chastity works against that of wantonness.
To her credit, McKay takes reports of such behavior more seriously than have most previous studies, but I was left with the unsettling impression that medicalizing Schubert's condition has allowed the author to reconcile the traditional requirement that a biography of a great composer demonstrate the fundamental virtue of its object with otherwise recalcitrant data: if Schubert's "periods of heavy drinking, dissoluteness, and laziness and his episodes of offensive behavior, were all linked to his medical condition" (p.
For government functionaries and church leaders, the factories and city slums were leading to a `decline in popular morality', manifest in a weakening of religious devotion, sexual dissoluteness and lack of respect for government and the law.