dissociative reaction


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

dis·so·ci·a·tive re·ac·tion

reaction characterized by such dissociative behavior as amnesia, fugues, sleepwalking, and dream states.

dis·so·ci·a·tive re·ac·tion

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv rē-ak'shŭn)
Reaction characterized by such dissociative behavior as amnesia, fugues, sleepwalking, and dream states.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(69) A dissociative reaction is typically triggered by environmental stimuli that mimic the environment in which the original stressors were experienced by the sufferer.
While this defense will be of no use to defendants presenting with sensation-seeking syndrome or depression-suicide syndrome, it is at least theoretically applicable to PTSD defendants who commit crimes while under the influence of a dissociative reaction. Because those individuals are said to be "on automatic," and to have reverted back to their conditioned training, an argument can be made that they are acting unconsciously within the meaning of the defense.
This self-report, 10-item questionnaire (5-point scale) assesses dissociative reactions that took place during the traumatic event.
* Dissociative reactions (eg, flashbacks) in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring
When the power source is turned on, borax undergoes a series of dissociative reactions; the fundamental mechanisms that result in boron reduction or deposition on the cathode (or work pieces) occur from a series of sequential reactions.
Friedman and his colleagues also might add degree of distress and functional impairment as well as dissociative reactions, to the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
The B3 criterion could address "dissociative reactions in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event were recurring." In addition, the B4 and B5 criteria also might be reworded because "psychological distress" is a very general term, he said.
The two characteristic features of most dissociative reactions are a disturbance of the self-identity of an individual, and/or a disturbance of the individual's memory (Putnam, 1985).
Rather, her dissociative reactions and defenses appear to be a way that she used to psychologically escape from an intolerable family situation, where she was overwhelmed by her parents exigencies and overprotection.
Hinson checked into Sibley Memorial Hospital for "counseling and treatment' for "dissociative reactions brought on by the intense emotional and physical exertion' of two years in Congress and his reelection campaign.