dissociative anesthesia


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Related to dissociative anesthesia: neuroleptanesthesia

dis·so·ci·a·tive an·es·the·si·a

a form of general anesthesia, but not necessarily complete unconsciousness, characterized by catalepsy, catatonia, and amnesia, especially that produced by phenylcyclohexylamine compounds, including ketamine.

dissociative anesthesia

[disō′shē·ətiv]
a unique anesthesia characterized by analgesia and amnesia with minimal effect on respiratory function. The patient does not appear to be anesthetized and can swallow and open eyes but does not process information. This form of anesthesia may be used to provide analgesia during brief, superficial operative procedures or diagnostic processes. Ketamine hydrochloride is a phencyclidine derivative used to induce dissociative anesthesia. Ketamine is used for trauma patients with very unstable, low blood pressure or for elderly patients. Emergence may be accompanied by delirium, excitement, disorientation, and confusion.

dis·so·ci·a·tive an·es·the·si·a

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv an'es-thē'zē-ă)
A form of general anesthesia, but not necessarily complete unconsciousness, characterized by catalepsy, catatonia, and amnesia, especially that produced by phenylcyclohexylamine compounds, including ketamine.

dis·so·ci·a·tive an·es·the·si·a

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv an'es-thē'zē-ă)
Form of general anesthesia, but not necessarily complete unconsciousness, characterized by catalepsy, catatonia, and amnesia.