dissociative


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dissociative

/dis·so·ci·a·tive/ (-so´se-a´tiv) pertaining to or tending to produce dissociation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The difference in cortisol was greatest in early pregnancy, when levels were eight times higher in the afternoon and 10 times higher at bedtime for the dissociative group than for other women.
Both fantasy proneness and dissociative experiences have been studied in the context of the Five Factor Model (FFM; Costa & McCrae, 1992).
Living with a dissociative disorder can be very distressing but there is help available.
Dissociative amnesia is the inability to recall important personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature that cannot be explained by ordinary forgetfulness, in the absence of overt brain pathology or substance use.
In light of this information, making a distinction between dissociative and non-dissociative subtypes while determining patient groups in biological studies related to PTSD will enable us to more accurately interpret the obtained biological data.
The original SDQ-20 items were derived from a pool of 75 items describing somatoform dissociative symptoms usually present in patients with dissociative disorders.
Like in other psychiatric disorders, co-morbidity is often found in dissociative disorder.
Dissociative amnesia is a well-established phenomenon and its documentation goes back as far as Freud.
Patients and Methods: Fifty four patients of dissociative disorders were included in the study by using consecutive non-probability sampling.
Indeed, narrowing the category represented by term I seems to be the main focus of Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca's explanation in The New Rhetoric, because in the dissociative process, some aspects of term I "will be disqualified and marked ultimately for disappearance" (p.