dissimulation

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dis·sim·u·la·tion

(dis'sim-yū-lā'shŭn),
Concealment of the truth about a situation, especially about a state of health or during a mental status examination, as by a malingerer or someone with a factitious disorder.
[L. dissimulatio, fr. dissimulo, to feign, fr. dis, apart, + simillis, same]

dis·sim·u·la·tion

(di-sim'yū-lā'shŭn)
Concealment of the truth about a situation, especially about a state of health or during a mental status examination, as by a malingerer or someone with a factitious disorder.
[L. dissimulatio, fr. dissimulo, to feign, fr. dis, apart, + similis, same]
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) In a court obsessed with appearance and dissimulation, how could involuntary confessions of the flesh possibly contribute to the development of the modern Western subject?
(14) Inspired by Baldassare Castiglione's Book of the Courtier (1528), court society placed an increasing demand on self-control, dissimulation, and courtliness.
At the outset of the text, the young princess, who has not been exposed to courtly stimuli, is quite inexperienced when it comes to discerning any kind of truth from this complex web of dissimulation. Before the princess and Cleves marry, Lafayette draws our attention to a blush that functions as a marker of social currency.
In the play's first musical moment, the vice Sedition's stage direction as he waits for the entrance of his partner in crime, Dissimulation, is simply: "seyng the leteny" (636).
(23) When Dissimulation continues, it is to pray for King Johan's death through the Paternoster, another legal Christian practice.
Bale creatively exploits the theatricality of the Roman Church by turning Dissimulation into a producer of sorts, assigning parts to his cast of clerics and prelates in order to keep congregants paying hefty sums to the church.
The consideration of La manganilla de Melilla relates the theme of prudent dissimulation to notions of military virtue, through the true story of the defence of the Spanish presidio in 1564, in the face of a besieging Moorish army, by the governor Pedro Venegas, in reality a corrupt leader, who used a series of stratagems to ravage his opponents' forces.
Using a plethora of quotations from the texts, Loewenstein shows how Lillburne developed a pugnacious rhetoric grounded in apocalyptic discourse while also employing the language of dissimulation to uncover the "treachery of Antichristian politics and power practiced under the guise of revolution and liberty" (33).
That is why the Egyptians had sculptures of sphinxes in all their temples, that is, to indicate that divine knowledge, if committed to writing at all, must be covered with enigmatic veils and poetic dissimulations."(47)
I additionally see Bronzino's "Sphinx," itself an enigmatically veiled poetic dissimulation, as contextually embodying a third aspect.
Nixon's unending dissimulations practically provoked the new discourse of psychohistory, which so titillated scholars in the 1970s and suggested a way of understanding Nixon as a phenomenon of mind rather than a practitioner of politics.