disseminated intravascular coagulopathy

disseminated intravascular coagulopathy

Hematology An acquired bleeding diathesis with a generally bad outcome in which the balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis tips toward the former; DIC is characterized by accelerated platelet consumption with coagulation factor depletion–↑ PT, ↑ PTT and stimulation of fibrinolysis–generation of fibrin split products Etiology Severe sepsis–30-65% of DIC is caused by infection, extensive burns, trauma, retained dead fetus, heat stroke, mismatched blood, metastatic CA, leukemia Clinical forms Fast DIC–acute, fulminant, uncompensated consumptive coagulopathy with severe bleeding, and ecchymosis due to abruptio placentae, septic abortion, amniotic fluid embolism, toxemia, malignancy, massive tissue injury–eg burns, surgery, trauma, infections, gram-negative sepsis, meningococcemia, RMSF, incompatible blood; 'fast' DIC requires replacement of deficient or consumed factors Slow DIC Due to chronic compensated illness, with few overt signs of bleeding; clinical picture is painted by thrombosis, microcirculatory ischemia, end-organ infarction, due to acute promyelocytic leukemia, coagulation factor transfusion, CA of pancreas, prostate, lung, stomach, aortic aneurysm, cocaine, IMAOs, giant hemangioma–Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, liver disease, vasculitis, chronic and/or low-grade infections–eg, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, malaria, obstetrics,–eg, hemolysis, eclampsia, dead fetus, infection, hypoxia, acidosis, respiratory distress; 'slow' DIC may respond to heparinization Lab ↑ PT, aPTT, FDPs, fibrinopeptide A; ↓ fibrinogen, prothrombin, platelets, factor V, factor VIII, antithrombin III, plasminogen, ↓ factors VII, IX, X, XI
References in periodicals archive ?
Postoperative complications included febrile morbidity in four cases (12.9%), wound infection in four cases (12.9%), disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) in three cases and gastrointestinal complications affecting only the subileus in seven cases (22%) in this study.
(1,6) Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and vascular thrombosis are known to occur in meningococcal infection due to the high levels of circulating procoagulant microparticles from platelets or granulocytes and disordered protein C activation in endothelial cells.
A further well-documented concern amongst patients conservatively managing IUFD is that of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC).
Characteristics, postpartum diagnoses at ICU admission and causes of death Patient Age Postpartum diagnoses at ICU admission 1 34 Respiratory failure and eclampsia 2 37 Shock 3 29 ARDS, DIC, pulmonary oedema and postpartum haemorrhage 4 29 DIC and eclampsia 5 36 DIC and pulmonary oedema 6 27 Respiratory failure and eclampsia Patient Comorbidities 1 Primary hypertension 2 Primary hypertension 3 None 4 None 5 None 6 None ICU: intensive care unit; ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome; DIC: disseminated intravascular coagulopathy
Despite appropriate therapy, fever persisted with splenomegaly and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and laboratory findings and bone marrow biopsy compatible with HLH.
Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, acute kidney injury, and lung injury can result from hemorrhage and protracted hypovolemia.9 The acute obstetrical renal morbidity is a serious maternal health issue endangering the life of the women, such types of the studies will help in taking timely appropriate measures in managing obstetrical emergencies and proper handling the high risk cases as well as managing the renal morbidities with multidisciplinary approach so as to decrease the mortality rate.
"The most dangerous thing that is often overlooked, even by some of the physicians that treat these on a regular basis, is localized intravascular coagulopathy, which if left untreated can progress to fulminant disseminated intravascular coagulopathy," he said.
Postoperative complications reported with the established conservative approach include severe postpartum hemorrhage, postoperative disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and infection resistant to antimicrobial therapy that may require laparotomy and hysterectomy [19].
On presentation, she was febrile and tachycardic with laboratory data significant for aminotransferase elevation (ALT 998 U/L, AST 4559 U/L) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) (Figures 3 and 4).
Other non-malignant causes include hemoglobinopathies, infections, drugs, anorexia nervosa, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), antiphospholipid syndrome, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) [3, 5, 6].
fever, anorexia, weight loss, depression, bilateral epistaxis, edema and erythema of scrotum, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and presence of tick infestation in five dogs and in one dog unilateral epistaxis were observed.
Febrile illness and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy were most common complications observed after obstetric hysterectomy.

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