disseminated gonococcal infection


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disseminated gonococcal infection

infection from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is spread to distant parts of the body beyond the original portal of entry (usually the lower genital tract). Usually manifest by rash and arthritis.

disseminated gonococcal infection

STD A form of N gonorrhoeae infection affecting ±3% of Pts; it is 4-fold more common in ♀, especially during pregnancy and perimenstrual period Clinical Classic triad–dermatitis, tenosynovitis, migratory polyarthralgia; DGI follows mucosal infection–eg, genitourinary tract, rectum, oropharynx Clinical forms
1. Arthritis-dermatitis syndrome–tenosynovitis with skin rash and fever, often positive blood culture, asymmetric polyarthralgia;1/4 have monoarthralgia Sites Knee, elbow, wrist, metacarpophalangeal, ankle joints.
2. Suppurative/septic arthritis–±1/3 of Pts, synovial fluid PMNs at 50,000–200,000 cells/mm3, maculopapular, pustular, vesicular or necrotic rash, often of torso, limbs, palms, soles; tenosynovitis in2/3 of Pts typically of hands and fingers; rarely, DGI causes pericarditis, endocarditis, meningitis, death. See Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ouanich et al., "Changing patterns of disseminated gonococcal infection in france: cross-sectional data 2009-2011," Sexually Transmitted Infections, vol.
Keiser, "Recurrent disseminated gonococcal infection in a patient with hypocomplementemia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis," Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, vol.
Judson, "Underlying complement deficiency in patients with disseminated gonococcal infection," Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol.
The diagnosis of disseminated gonococcal infection is usually made by clinical examination and culture of specimens from the genital tract, blood, or joint effusion.
Disseminated gonococcal infection usually responds promptly to intravenous antibiotic therapy.
Disseminated gonococcal infection caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae with unique nutritional requirements.
Pregnant women have been reported to be at higher risk of disseminated gonococcal infection, but there is evidence to the contrary.
Disseminated gonococcal infection follows a local infection approximately 1% to 3% of the time.
In summary, the case presented illustrates one aspect of the life-threatening nature of disseminated gonococcal infection. Although the incidence of gonococcal endocarditis is rare, the increasing incidence of local gonococcal infections and the aggressiveness the gonococcus demonstrates in the destruction of heart valves would suggest caution in the treatment of any gonococcal infection.
For those allergic to penicillins or cephalosporins, or for treatment of disseminated gonococcal infections, PID, and epididymitis, see www.cdc.gov/std/trestmont.

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