disseminated aspergillosis


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dis·sem·i·nat·ed as·per·gil·lo·sis

a variety of bronchopulmonary aspergillosis characterized by a generalized infection of the lung with Aspergillus, occurring usually in people with defective immune response.

aspergillosis

a disease caused by species of Aspergillus, marked by inflammatory granulomatous lesions in the skin, ear, orbit, nasal sinuses, lungs, and sometimes bones and meninges. Abortion due to fungal placentitis is common in cows and occurs also in mares and sows. Subacute pulmonary involvement may be accompanied by lesions at all levels in the respiratory tract. Congenital infection of the fetus, especially manifested by dermatitis, is a rare accompaniment. A gastroenteritis with ulceration in the esophagus and forestomachs occurs in calves. Rarely osteomyelitis, intestinal and central nervous system involvement have been recorded in dogs, the most frequent site of infection being the nasal cavity. See also brooder pneumonia.

avian aspergillosis
principal manifestation is as pneumonia but systemic invasion, dermatitis, osteomyelitis, ophthalmitis, encephalitis also occur. Species involved are A. fumigatus, A. flavus.
disseminated aspergillosis
in dogs, a disseminated disease characterized by signs of generalized infection, lymphadenopathy, diskospondylitis, and lameness, paresis or paraplegia. A. terreus is the most common etiologic agent and German shepherd dogs are predisposed. Cats with disseminated aspergillosis usually have concurrent immunosuppressive disease.
nasal aspergillosis
a localized form of aspergillosis, involving the nose, ears and paranasal sinuses. In dogs, there is usually a unilateral or bilateral serosanguinous nasal discharge and a characteristic depigmentation and ulceration of skin adjacent to the external nares.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disseminated Aspergillosis and Moniliasis Associated with Agranulocytosis and Antibiotic Therapy.
Central nervous system (CNS) is the most prevalent site for disseminated aspergillosis.
The echinocandins have no hepatotoxicity or nephrotoxicity and are effective in animal models of esophageal candidiasis, disseminated candidiasis, Pneumocystis carinii, and invasive pulmonary and disseminated aspergillosis.
The echinocandins demonstrate a high degree of efficacy in animal models of esophageal candidiasis, disseminated candidiasis, Pneumocystis carinii, and invasive pulmonary and disseminated aspergillosis.
Noskin's poster noted that the historical mortality rates after bone marrow transplantation approach 90% for pulmonary aspergillosis and invasive candidiasis and can reach 100% for disseminated aspergillosis.

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