dissect

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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 3: Daily accretion rate of chemical constituents of lean and its proportions (Percent) relative to the dissectible carcass lean weight at the end of feeding restriction and realimentation phases in Najdi lambs
An accompanying multimedia CD-ROM contains an assortment of animations, videos, puzzles, exercises, and a dissectible 3-D image of the brain.
The idea resonated with western thinkers keen on separating the soul (immortal and judicious thought) from the body (pure, dissectible nature), which like women could and should be conquered, by force if necessary, for the benefit of civilization.
This stands in stark contrast to the practices through which mass media and political institutions reify public opinion into a measurable and dissectible product.
"Teachers wanted something more than just a dissectible frog," says Ramani Pichumani, Stanford research investigator and project manager.