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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The other two experimental groups had much higher germination success (dissected single seeds (DS) = 84.0%, dissected multiple seeds (DM) = 78.5%).
Anatomy Tour Time is a unique laboratory experience that benefits the students in four ways: 1) by keeping the students attentive to the progress of the dissection, 2) by providing repetition in seeing and hearing about the dissected structures for both the tour guides and the tourists, 3) by acquainting the students with normal anatomic variation, and 4) by providing students with experience in teaching others, a skill that will be needed when they become clinicians.
In the words of the anatomist Alessandro Benedetti, writing in 1497, "By law only unknown and ignoble bodies can be sought for dissection, from distant regions without injury to neighbors and relatives."(34) I would argue that these people were dissected in the first instance qua poor foreigners rather than qua criminals, as is clear from the mid-fifteenth-century statutes of the university of Bologna, which required only that the cadaver belong to a person who came from at least 30 miles away.(35) This hypothesis gains further support from the fact that hospital patients were the next major group to come under the dissector's knife, as we will shortly see.
Animals were then sacrificed and whole brains dissected for determination of total luciferase activities.
Her body was dissected, and her brain and the "Hottentot apron" that resulted from the stretching of her labia, placed in jars.
We dissected along the infiltration plane to the ranula while managing to avoid rupturing it and preventing the loss of too much soft tissue.
There's a pleasing element of wit in Nengudi's reconfigurations of this alternately protective, constrictive, and "improving" article of women's clothing, as the dissected nylons demonstrate the absurd practicality of their own construction.
"Autopsy Room Four" finds Howard Cottrell lying on the autopsy table, waiting to be dissected. He can smell, he can hear, he can see and he can feel, but he can't speak or move.
Plan and section are consonant, for the building is dissected in each dimension into three parts.
Instead of recommending a new center on government and media in Washington (there are already several think tanks around the country that chew over Big Questions), he might have dissected some process stories and suggested ways to make them more compelling.
Gomez-Pinilla and other neurobiologists have aimed to fill this information gap by working with lab animals such as mice and rats--creatures that can be easily manipulated to sort out each one of an experiment's variables and that, unlike people, can be dissected in the end to get an insider's view of the brain.
The researchers allowed the young rats and the offspring of the pregnant rats to mature, then harvested the adult aimals and measured biomarkers of serotonin system function in their dissected brains.