dissect


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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

/dis·sect/ (dĭ-sekt´) (di-sekt´)
1. to cut apart, or separate.
2. to expose structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.

dissect

[disekt′]
Etymology: L, dissecare, to cut apart
1 to cut apart tissues for visual or microscopic study using a scalpel, a probe, or scissors. Compare bisect.
2 to tear away the intima of an artery, creating a false lumen that allows blood to flow into the wall of the artery. Branching vessels can be obstructed. An aortic dissection that spreads to the coronary arteries can cause sudden death. dissection, n.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suddenly contented to allow his fellow students to dissect Ryoko, Hiroshi spends his time drawing the human body.
He has found that his school dissects fetal pigs in anatomy classes.
DISSECT is a word attack strategy for reading unknown, polysyllabic words.
Dissections are carded out in the vast majority of American high schools, although they've reportedly declined since 1987, when the California Supreme Court supported a high school student's refusal to dissect a frog.
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The mass was bluntly dissected from the major vessels of the neck, but it was not possible to dissect it from the vagus nerve.
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A generous tympanomeatal flap might be necessary to provide adequate exposure to dissect the cholesteatoma from the tympanum.
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This is better than dissecting frogs,'' he said, noting that the test Neal pulled him from contained a part where he'd have to dissect a frog.