dissect


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dissect

 [dĭ-sekt´, di-sekt´]
to cut apart, or separate; especially, the exposure of structures of a cadaver for anatomical study.

dis·sect

(di-sekt'), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dissect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sected, dis·secting, dis·sects
To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.

dis·sect

(di-sekt')
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. surgery To separate structures along natural lines or planes of cleavage.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]

dis·sect

(di-sekt') Avoid the mispronunciation dī'sekt.
1. To cut apart or separate the tissues of the body for study.
2. In an operation, to separate the different structures along natural lines by dividing the connective tissue framework.
[L. dis-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut asunder]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cuchna says Lamar's label is aware of Dissect, but it hasn't offered any feedback.
You will get to: | Dissect a real head and brain sample | Dissect the pulmonary system | Dissect the heart and greater blood vessels | Dissect and observe the gastrointestinal tract | Dissect and observe the structure of the limbs What is the meal?
One cannot love a corpse; one cannot dissect one's love.
As Helen MacDonald and Michael Sappol, among many other authors, display, medical schools and their students applied the most intriguing and dishonest tricks to acquire bodies to dissect. In our day, however, the study and practice of medicine (in all of its specialties) has been questioned in relation to the use of cadavers.
As in most gross anatomy labs, one cadaver is shared by several students so every student does not get to dissect during every lab period.
Unlike real frogs that have been dissected, the computer-frog's organs still work.
And what are we teaching kids - dissect them at school and then what's to stop him from going home and doing it to any other animal?" Douglas asked.
The real brains behind the virtual frogs are Rick Hill and David Hughes, who dissect actual animals and take thousands of digital photos of the process.
If they want to dissect evolution, then intelligent design should be similarly scrutinized.
Instead, he encourages parents to teach discernment, which "leads to critical thinking based on clearly defined criteria." He suggests parents use scriptural principles, such as those expressed by Saint Paul when writing to the Philippians: "[Y]our thoughts should be wholly directed to all that is true, all that deserves respect, all that is honest, pure, admirable, decent, virtuous, or worthy of praise" (Philippians 4:8), to dissect the hollow philosophies put forth by pop culture.
Additionally, they could directly counter--or at the very least, balance--the tide of foreign-produced, "anthropological" documentaries which have attempted to present or dissect Bolivia's pueblos indigenas, often without regard or respect for indigenous community protocols and cultural/intellectual property rights.
In conventional diathermy, monopolar diathermy in the coagulation mode is used to dissect hemorrhoidal tissue from the internal sphincter.