disruptive behavior disorders


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

disruptive behavior disorders

 
a group of mental disorders of children and adolescents consisting of behavior that violates social norms and is disruptive, often distressing others more than it does the person with the disorder. It includes conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder and is classified with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
The DSM-IV-TR Based Disruptive Behavior Disorders Screening and Rating Scale: This is a screening and assessment instrument, which was developed based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria, consists of 9 items inquiring attention problems; 6 items inquiring hyperactivity; 3 items inquiring impulsivity; 8 items inquiring oppositional defiant disorder and 15 items inquiring conduct disorder.
In the third research review, Grothaus discusses disruptive behavior disorders such as conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, and describes the characteristics and costs of these disorders.
The childhood diagnoses delineated by the American Psychiatric Association include learning disorders and mental retardation, autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit and disruptive behavior disorders, attachment disorders, eating disorders, and separation anxiety disorder.
Jensen knew that these children's needs went beyond trauma, so he suggested training providers in depression, anxiety, and disruptive behavior disorders as well.
53) followed a cohort of 48 children with an IQ under 84 and disruptive behavior disorders, who were treated with risperidone, in an open label fashion for two years.
A large amount of research has been done on Disruptive Behavior Disorders in general and on Oppositional Defiant Disorder in particular.
We do screen for possible comorbid conditions, including the other disruptive behavior disorders (conduct and oppositional defiant disorder) and anxiety and depressive spectrum disorders.
Overall, 23 psychiatric conditions were found, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (74%), learning disorders (26%), cognitive disorders (26%), disruptive behavior disorders (21%), and anxiety disorders (18%).
We review existing studies of attrition in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an empirically supported treatment for preschool-aged children with disruptive behavior disorders.
1998) in which child disruptive behavior disorders are inadvertently established and/or maintained by the parent-child interactions.
Another study performed by the Indiana University School of Medicine using functional MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scans found the brain activity of aggressive adolescents diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) is different from that of other adolescents when both groups viewed violent video games.