disperse phase


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Related to disperse phase: Continuous phase, Tyndall effect, sol

phase

 [fāz]
1. one of the aspects or stages through which a varying entity may pass.
2. In physical chemistry, any physically or chemically distinct, homogeneous, and mechanically separable part of a system.
phase 0 in cardiac physiology, the phase representing the upstroke of the action potential, in which rapid depolarization occurs after the cell reaches or is driven to threshold potential. It is the result of the opening of fast sodium channels and calcium channels.
phase 1 in cardiac physiology, the initial rapid repolarization phase of the action potential, caused by the closure of the fast sodium channels and an exodus of potassium from the cell.
phase 2 in cardiac physiology, the phase representing the plateau of the action potential, which contributes to the refractory period of the heart; there is a slow entry of calcium into the cell. It is the result of a balance between inward and outward currents and is particularly long in Purkinje and ventricular cells.
phase 3 in cardiac physiology, the terminal rapid repolarization phase of the action potential; it begins with the closing of the slow channels, resulting in an exodus of potassium from the cell and the activation of the sodium-potassium pump. The result is reestablishment of the normal resting potential.
phase 4 in cardiac physiology, the phase representing electrical diastole, i.e. the time between action potentials. It is the resting phase of the electrical cardiac cycle and is steadily maintained in nonpacemaker cells. In pacemaker cells, the membrane potential is normally reduced slowly until threshold potential is reached; if there is an outside stimulus, it may be driven down more rapidly.
continuous phase in a heterogeneous system, the component in which the disperse phase is distributed, corresponding to the solvent in a true solution. See also colloid.
disperse phase the discontinuous portion of a heterogeneous system, corresponding to the solute in a true solution.
G1 phase a part of the cell cycle during interphase, lasting from the end of cell division (the M phase) until the start of DNA synthesis (the S phase).
G2 phase a relatively quiescent part of the cell cycle during interphase, lasting from the end of DNA synthesis (the S phase) until the start of cell division (the M phase).
M phase the part of the cell cycle during which mitosis occurs; subdivided into prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.
S phase a part of the cell cycle near the end of interphase, during which DNA is synthesized; it comes between the G1 and G2 phases.

disperse phase

The state of a substance in a heterogeneous system in which particles are separated from each other, e.g., oil particles in water.
See also: phase
References in periodicals archive ?
where N(x, t) = [integral] dzP*(t,x, z) is the local particle number density and the overbar followed by an asterisk denotes the average conditioned to the presence of disperse phase centered at (x, t).
The interaction term appearing in (18) represents the statistical average of the net flux over the entire boundary of a single disperse element, [S.sub.p], per unit average volume, times the disperse phase void fraction.
According to these results, it is clear that the disperse phase is theless rigid one for the 40% ESO polymers, contrary to what was observed for the 60% ESO systems, where the disperse phase is more rigid than the continuous one.
As it is well known, the presence of a more ductile disperse phase (21), (28), or dispersed microvoids (29) in a stiffer matrix can promote the plastic deformation of the matrix increasing the material toughness.
6 as the disperse phase amount increases, increasing the number of interfaces and so its influence.
The values of radii of disperse phase calculated by Eq.
The size distribution of the disperse phase for blends with 25 and 75 wt% of PA6 processed in the single or twin-screw extruders is shown in Fig.
The optical detector produces a signal (a voltage V) that ranges from a minimum set value called baseline value ([V.sub.0]) measured during the polymer matrix flow without the disperse phase, to the maximum value, called saturation value ([V.sub.S]), achieved when the light path is totally blocked.
Phase morphology analyses involve the three-dimensional structure of the disperse phase being characterized with a warrantable outlay so that conclusions can then be drawn about the influencing variables.
If the EPC semycristalline is not completely surrounded, the rubber may appear as segregated particles of much less volume than that corresponding to the total disperse phase [20].
C, can be expressed as a function of the shear rate and the concentration of the disperse phase [Phi] [21, 23].
The explanation for this is that the extracted disperse phase, which has little influence on the number average diameter obtained by SEM at low concentrations, becomes critical at higher concentrations where the morphology is fibrillar, lamellar, or co-continuous.